Milroy, Robert Huston, 1816-1890

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1816-06-11
Death 1890-03-29

Biographical notes:

Born into a prominent Indiana pioneer family, Milroy attended a military academy in Vermont. He served as a captain in the Mexican War, and as colonel of the 9th Indiana Regiment during the Civil War. In 1872 he became superintendent of Indian Affairs and moved to Washington Territory.

From the description of Letter, 1862 August 4, Woodville, Va. [to] Maj. T.A. Meysenberg. (Indiana Historical Society Library). WorldCat record id: 31906393

Robert H. Milroy of Indiana entered Norwich University in 1840 and graduated in 1843. He was distinguished for his athletic ability and was valedictorian of his class. Milroy served as a captain during the Mexican War, 1846-1847. Following the Mexican War, Milroy attended law school and practiced his profession in Indiana. During the Civil War, Milroy served with the 9th Indiana Volunteer Infantry and performed service in West Virginia under Generals McClellan and Rosecrans. On 15 June 1863, Milroy's force was attacked by General Robert E. Lee's army, then on its march to Pennsylvania. His retreat at the time was controversial. Later, General Milroy became known for his actions in suppressing guerrilla warfare in West Virginia. Later in life, he moved to Olympia, WA. He married Mary Jane Armitage (d. 1904) in 1849 and seven children were born to them.

From the description of Robert Houston Milroy papers, 1874. (University of Rochester). WorldCat record id: 639983605

Robert Huston Milroy was born 11 June 1816 near Salem, Indiana. His father, General Samuel Milroy, moved the family to Carroll County, Indiana, in 1826. In 1843, the younger Milroy graduated from Norwich University, a Vermont military institution, with Masters Degrees in Arts, Civil Engineering, and Military Science. He traveled throughout New England, teaching fencing and boxing, for several months. Upon his return to Indiana, he commenced legal studies, but interrupted them twice for military pursuits, first in Texas and then in the Mexican War, serving as Captain in the First Indiana Infantry. He graduated from the Indiana School of Law at Bloomington and was admitted to the bar in 1850. The governor of Indiana appointed Milroy President Judge of the Eighth Judicial District in 1852. Two years later, he moved to Rensselaer, Indiana, where he established a practice of law lasting until the outbreak of the Civil War. Milroy served with distinction and some controversy in the Civil War, rising in the ranks to Major General by 1862, but was also tried and acquitted of cowardice.

Following the war, Robert Milroy resigned his commission and partnered with Judge Gould to form a law firm in Delphi, Indiana. He declined an appointment as U.S. Marshall of Wyoming Territory in 1871, but in 1872, moved to Olympia, Washington, to serve as Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Washington Territory. When that position was abolished, Milroy became U.S. Prosecuting Attorney, then in 1875, U.S. Indian Agent for Puyallup, Nisqually, and other tribes in southwest Washington. Finally, Milroy became an agent for the Yakima (Yakama) Indians in eastern Washington from 1882-1885, replacing James Wilbur. He was removed in 1885 due to a change in political control of the Executive Branch.

In 1849, Robert Milroy married Mary J. Armitage, daughter of Valerius Armitage, a major contractor in the construction of the Wabash and Erie Canal. They had seven children. Sons Bruce and Walter practiced together as attorneys in the North Yakima, Washington Territory, firm of Milroy, Irwin and Milroy. A lifelong Presbyterian, Milroy served as an Elder in the church, and was a strong supporter of the temperance movement. Milroy was also a member of the Indiana Second Constitutional Convention of 1850. His involvement in transportation projects included his election by the General Assembly of Indiana as Trustee of the Wabash and Erie Canal in 1867, and the instigation of two railroads: from Indianapolis to Chicago, passing through Delphi, Indiana; and Olympia to Tenino, Washington. Milroy died in Olympia, Washington, in March 1890, and is buried in the Masonic Cemetery.

From the description of Robert Huston Milroy papers, 1773-1893. (Oregon Historical Society Research Library). WorldCat record id: 63167106

Robert Huston Milroy was born 11 June 1816 in Indiana. By 1826 the family had moved to Carroll County, IN. Milroy graduated from Norwich Military Academy in Vermont in 1843 and went on to graduate from Indiana University Law School in 1850. He became a lawyer and judge in Rensselaer, IN. Milroy formed and led the volunteer G Regiment of the Indiana Infantry. He later reached the rank of Major General and was known as the "Grey Eagle of the Army." In 1868 he was elected trustee of the Wabash & Erie Canal Company. He then held the office of Superintendent of Indian affairs in Washington territory, 1872-75, and that of Indian agent in Washington territory, 1875-85. Milroy died in Olympia, Wash., March 29, 1890.

H.D. Gibson was a respected citizen of Marion County, Indiana. He served in the Union Army during the Civil War and rose to the rank of Major. After the War, he became an agent for the Puyallup, Nisqually and Chehalis Reservation in Washington Territory. While returning from hunting with his friend, he died suddenly on Aug. 12, 1875.

From the description of Robert H. Milroy's correspondence, 1872-1880. (Washington State Library, Office of Secretary of State). WorldCat record id: 272405532

Robert Huston Milroy was born 11 June 1816 near Salem, Indiana. His father, General Samuel Milroy, moved the family to Carroll County, Indiana, in 1826. In 1843, the younger Milroy graduated from Norwich University, a Vermont military institution, with Masters Degrees in Arts, Civil Engineering, and Military Science. He traveled throughout New England, teaching fencing and boxing, for several months. Upon his return to Indiana, he commenced legal studies, but interrupted them twice for military pursuits, first in Texas and then in the Mexican War, serving as Captain in the First Indiana Infantry. He graduated from the Indiana School of Law at Bloomington and was admitted to the bar in 1850. The governor of Indiana appointed Milroy President Judge of the Eighth Judicial District in 1852. Two years later, he moved to Rensselaer, Indiana, where he established a practice of law lasting until the outbreak of the Civil War. Milroy served with distinction and some controversy in the Civil War, rising in the ranks to Major General by 1862, but was also tried and acquitted of cowardice.

Following the war, Robert Milroy resigned his commission and partnered with Judge Gould to form a law firm in Delphi, Indiana. He declined an appointment as U. S. Marshall of Wyoming Territory in 1871, but in 1872, moved to Olympia, Washington, to serve as Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Washington Territory. When that position was abolished, Milroy became U. S. Prosecuting Attorney, then in 1875, U. S. Indian Agent for Puyallup, Nisqually, and other tribes in southwest Washington. Finally, Milroy became an agent for the Yakima (Yakama) Indians in eastern Washington from 1882-1885, replacing James Wilbur. He was removed in 1885 due to a change in political control of the Executive Branch.

In 1849, Robert Milroy married Mary J. Armitage, daughter of Valerius Armitage, a major contractor in the construction of the Wabash and Erie Canal. They had seven children. Sons Bruce and Walter practiced together as attorneys in the North Yakima, Washington Territory, firm of Milroy, Irwin and Milroy.

A lifelong Presbyterian, Milroy served as an Elder in the church, and was a strong supporter of the temperance movement. Milroy was also a member of the Indiana Second Constitutional Convention of 1850. His involvement in transportation projects included his election by the General Assembly of Indiana as Trustee of the Wabash and Erie Canal in 1867, and the instigation of two railroads: from Indianapolis to Chicago, passing through Delphi, Indiana; and Olympia to Tenino, Washington. Milroy died in Olympia, Washington, in March 1890, and is buried in the Masonic Cemetery.

From the guide to the Robert Huston Milroy Papers, 1773-1893, (Oregon Historical Society)



Biographical notes are generated from the bibliographic and archival source records supplied by data contributors.

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Subjects:

  • Land -- Washington Territory
  • Washington (State)
  • Indian agents--Correspondence
  • Yakama Indians
  • Off-reservation boarding schools - Forest Grove (Or.)
  • Indians of North America--Government relations
  • Native Americans
  • Puyallup Indians--Children
  • Off-reservation boarding schools
  • Geometry--Study and teaching
  • Land
  • Government and Politics
  • Mathematics--Study and teaching
  • Astronomy--Study and teaching
  • Military education
  • Puyallup Indians -- Children
  • African Americans--History--1863-1877

Occupations:

  • Indian agents -- Washington Territory

Places:

  • Indiana (as recorded)
  • Washington Territory (as recorded)
  • North Yakima (Wash.) (as recorded)
  • Fort Simcoe (Wash.) (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Forest Grove (Or.) (as recorded)
  • Washington (State) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • North Yakima (Wash.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Fort Simcoe (Wash.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Washington Territory (as recorded)
  • Washington Territory (as recorded)
  • Olympia (Wash.) (as recorded)
  • Vermont (as recorded)
  • Olympia (Wash.) (as recorded)