Bloom, Lansing Bartlett, 1880-

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1880
English, Spanish; Castilian

Biographical notes:

Lansing B. Bloom, a Presbyterian minister, came to New Mexico in 1912 and worked at several missions, before accepting a staff position with the Museum of New Mexico and School of American Research in Santa Fe, in 1917. In 1924, Bloom became a fellow of the Historical Society of New Mexico, where he held the position of secretary until his death in 1946. He served as editor of the New Mexico Historical Review (NMHR), from its inception in 1926 until 1946, dates which coincide with his teaching duties in the Department of History, at UNM. Over the course of years, from 1928-1940, Bloom made numerous trips to the archives of Mexico, Spain, and Italy where he conducted research on the history of New Mexico, the Southwest and Northern Mexico. Bloom located and copied thousands of documents that were hitherto unknown to Southwest historians. Bloom published many articles based on these documents between 1913 and his death in 1946.

From the description of Papers, 1540-1946 (bulk 1870-1946) (University of New Mexico-Main Campus). WorldCat record id: 43925468

Bloom was assistant director of the Museum of New Mexico and later was a history professor at the University of New Mexico, and president of the Historical Society of New Mexico.

From the description of Lansing B. Bloom collection, 1551-1940. (Museum of New Mexico Library). WorldCat record id: 37434982

Lansing Bloom was a notable New Mexican historian who was closely associated with the Historical Society of New Mexico and the School of American Research in Santa Fe. He was also co-editor of the first "New Mexico Historical Review and a history professor at the University of New Mexico. John R. McFie was a District and Supreme Court judge in New Mexico.

From the guide to the Bloom-McFie Collection, 1846-1938, (New Mexico State Records Center and Archives)

Bloom was a notable New Mexican historian who was closely associated with the Historical Society of New Mexico and the School of American Research in Santa Fe. He was also co-editor of the first "New Mexico Historical Review" and a history professor at the University of New Mexico.

From the description of Bloom-McFie collection, 1846-1938. (Santa Fe Public Library). WorldCat record id: 37653095

Lansing Bloom was assistant director of the Museum of New Mexico and later a professor of history at the University of New Mexico. He was president of the Historical Society of New Mexico.

From the guide to the Lansing B. Bloom Collection, 1930-1940, (New Mexico History Museum. Fray Angélico Chávez History Library.)

The New Mexico Historical Review (NMHR) was initiated by Lansing B. Bloom and Paul A. F. Walter in January of 1926. Its mission was to "publish legitimate historical material of New Mexican and regional interest." The region was understood to include "the area of the Spanish Colonial Viceroyalty of New Spain North from Mexico City, since the earlier history of New Mexico is an integral part of the history of the expansion of the Northern frontier of New Spain." NMHR would "welcome papers from experts in other fields when they are slanted to the historical point of view; anthropology, archaeology, art, economics, ethnology, geography, law, music, and sociology... Memoirs, diaries, letters, and the like" were also welcome.

Lansing B. Bloom, an ordained Presbyterian minister, came to New Mexico in 1912 and worked at several missions including the Jemez Pueblo church before accepting a staff position with the Museum of New Mexico and School of American Research in 1917. In 1924, Bloom became a fellow of the Historical Society of New Mexico, where he held the position of secretary until his death in 1946. He served as co-editor of the New Mexico Historical Review, with Paul A. F. Walter, from its inception until 1946, which coincided with his teaching duties in the Department of History at the University of New Mexico.

Paul A.F. Walter came to New Mexico in the early 1900's. In 1914, he established El Palacio, the journal of the Museum of New Mexico, which he edited until 1944. Walter served as president of the Historical Society of New Mexico from 1926-1959 and as co-editor the New Mexico Historical Review (with Lansing Bloom) from the first issue until his retirement from the Society in 1963. Walter died in 1966.

Frank Driver Reeve succeeded Bloom as co-editor with Walter from 1946-1963. He remained as editor until 1964. Reeve made significant contributions in the study of the history of New Mexico and the Southwest. He is best known for his scholarly research on the Navajo from Colonial times through the nineteenth-century, and his three volume History of New Mexico. He was on the faculty of the University of New Mexico for 36 years, retiring in 1964. He suffered from bad health through most of his life and died on December 31, 1967.

Eleanor B. Adams assumed the duties of editor of the Review from 1964 until 1975. The New Mexico Historical Review has seen a succession of highly qualified editors who have furthered the mission of the founders until the present day. The New Mexico Historical Review has been published by the University of New Mexico since 1963.

From the guide to the New Mexico Historical Review Records, 1926-1985, (University of New Mexico. Center for Southwest Research.)

Lansing B. Bloom, an ordained Presbyterian minister, came to New Mexico in 1912 and worked at several missions, including the Jemez Pueblo church, before accepting a staff position with the Museum of New Mexico and School of American Research in Santa Fe, in 1917. In 1924, Bloom became a fellow of the Historical Society of New Mexico, where he held the position of secretary until his death in 1946. He served as editor of the New Mexico Historical Review (NMHR), with Paul A. F. Walter as managing editor, from its inception in 1926 until 1946, dates which coincide with his teaching duties in the Department of History, University of New Mexico.

Over the course of years, from 1928-1940, Bloom and his wife, Maude McFie Bloom, made numerous trips to the archives of Mexico, Spain, and Italy where he conducted research on the history of New Mexico, the Southwest and Northern Mexico. Sometimes their children, Carol and John, accompanied them. Bloom located and copied thousands of documents in those archives that were hitherto unknown to Southwest historians, greatly adding to the historical record and expanding on the work done earlier by Adolph F. Bandelier and Herbert Eugene Bolton. A large part of the photostat copy documents have been deposited at UNM Library. Some of them are also at the Library of Congress and the Bancroft Library.

Just a few of his countless "discoveries" in these archives were the rival 1540 claims and lawsuits of Cortes, Guzman, and Alvarado to explore the northern frontier of New Spain; the Gallegos report of the Rodriguez-Chamuscado expedition; Lujan's report of the Espejo expedition; Fray Marcos de Niza's Relación and the residencia of Francisco Váizquez de Coronaodo, the Governor of Nueva Galicia and Cristóbal de Oñate, the Lt. Governor. He also found many documents pertaining to Juan de Oñate (Onate) and the founding of New Mexico; accounts of Alonso de Benavidez's activities in Spain; documents for the Governorship of Luis de Rosas; the Inquisition cases of Governors Peñalosa and López de Mendizabal; accounts of the 1680 Pueblo Revolt, Otermin's recovery activities and De Vargas's reconquest. He located royal cedulas for New Mexico, accounts of the missionaries and reports on Indian affairs in New Mexico. In the AGI Contraduria files he tracked the expenses, personnel and supplies over the decades that kept the New Mexico colony alive, thus filling in the details of New Mexico's documentary past that was lost in the Pueblo Revolt. He also located the lost Bandelier colored illustrations of the Franciscan missions of New Mexico and the Southwest and the Florentine Codex or Sahagun's history of the Indians of New Spain.

One of the pieces Bloom worked on as editor of the New Mexico Historical Review ( NMHR ) was the 1870-1882 field notes or diary of Captain John G. Bourke, who was appointed by the army to study the Indians of the West. In 1931, Bourke's daughter loaned the field notes to Bloom for study and publication, after which they would be deposited at West Point ( NMHR, "Biennial Report to Historical Society of New Mexico," April 1933). Bloom ran the edited notes or diary in the NMHR from January 1933 to April 1938, when a usage dispute suspended the series. (A brief overview of the NMHR Bourke series is contained in the NMHR finding guide at CSWR.) Bloom's 84 volume copy of Bourke's field notes is catalogued at CSWR (See Related Sources). The Bloom series also contains notes related to editing and publishing the field notes or diary, and a card index to the Bourke field note entries.

Scholars continue to use the documents Bloom located and brought to UNM, carrying on his legacy of historical study and publication. The photostats of these documents, Bloom's transcriptions of some of them and assorted notes are located in the AGI/AGN (Archivo General de las Indias - Archivo General de la Nación) collection at the CSWR. He was responsible for the major part of the selections in the AGI collection, while he and Dr. George P. Hammond also collected many of the ones from the AGN that are now in the CSWR. Many of Bloom's notes are also found in the frontispiece of each volume. France V. Scholes was Bloom's associate at UNM. After Bloom's death in 1946, Scholes continued this research tradition and added to the document collection at UNM. In addition, some of Bloom's transcription work and notes are also inadvertently contained in the France V. Scholes Collection at CSWR. Bloom published many articles based on these documents between 1913 and his death in 1946.

From the guide to the Lansing B. Bloom Papers, 1540-1946 (bulk 1870-1946), (University of New Mexico. Center for Southwest Research.)

The majority of the primary documents in this collection were copied at the Archivo General de La Nación (AGN), in Mexico City, between 1927 and 1970, by UNM History professors Lansing Bartlett Bloom and France Vinton Scholes, who used the material for their research and seminars on New Mexican and Mexican history. Other contributors included George P. Hammond and Eleanor Adams. Lesser amounts of documents came from the Archivo Histórico Militar de México, Biblioteca Nacional de México, and Museo Nacional de México, and various archives in Yucatan.

The Archivo General de la Nación de México falls under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of the Interior and is charged with the maintenance, description, and preservation of documents of Mexico. The archive was created in 1792 as the General Archives of New Spain by viceroy Juan Vicente de Guemes Pacheco y Padilla, the second Conde de Revillagigedo, to sort and organize all the viceregal documents. Following independence in 1823 the archive was renamed Archivo General y Público de la Nación. Several times during the nineteenth century Mexico City was occupied by foreign powers and the documents were removed to other locations for safekeeping and later returned. The name of the archive was changed to Archivo General de la Nación de México in 1918. The AGN currently has more than 6 million documents, maps, cartogafías, photographs, audio tapes, videos, manuscripts, etc.

Lansing Bloom came to New Mexico in 1912 and besides teaching at UNM, was involved in a variety of organizations in Santa Fe, including the Museum of New Mexico, the School of American Research and the Historical Society of New Mexico. He was a founder and editor of the New Mexico Historical Review, from its inception in 1926 until his death in 1946. He was responsible for most of the selections in the AGN collection. Knowing that the early documents for New Mexico had been lost during the Pueblo Revolt, he made numerous trips to the archives of Mexico, Spain, and Italy between from 1928 and 1940 to find information. He located and copied thousands of documents that were hitherto unknown to Southwest historians, depositing them at UNM. To understand New Mexico events, he also collected a considerable amount of material on the northern provinces of Mexico and the surrounding Borderlands.

Scholes also added much to this collection. He came to Albuquerque in 1924, teaching at UNM off and on from 1924 to 1954, and regularly from 1946-1970, when he retired. His areas of interest covered colonial New Mexico, Mexico and the Yucatan. He worked for the Library of Congress copying Spanish documents about the U.S. Borderlands in the archives of Mexico. As head of the Carnegie Post-Columbian History Section he searched for Yucatan and Mayan material in the archives of Spain and Mexico. For comparisons, he collected documents about the history of the Caribbean, Central America and Latin America - adding another dimension to this collection. Scholes focused his research on Cortes as he approached retirement. He was Visiting Professor of History at Tulane University until his death in 1979.

Both Bloom and Scholes published scholarly works based on documents from this collection. The New Mexico Historical Review carried articles about their lives and research activities, as well as historical studies by them.

This descriptive guide for the AGN material at the CSWR was the brain child of Robert Himmerich y Valencia, as editor of the New Mexico Historical Review. The initial layout was developed by Felicia Guerra and graduate students from the NMHR office and was later continued by fellows from the CSWR.

From the guide to the Documents from the Archivo General de La Nación de México and other related archives, 1520-1878, (University of New Mexico Center for Southwest Research)

The majority of the primary documents in this collection were copied at the Archivo General de Indias (AGI), in Sevilla, between 1927 - 1970 by UNM History professors Lansing Bartlett Bloom and France Vinton Scholes for their research and seminars on New Mexican and Mexican history, as well as related areas. Other contributors included George P. Hammond and Eleanor Adams. Lesser amounts of documents came from the Archivo Historico Nacional, Madrid; the Biblioteca Nacional, Madrid; El Escorial, Madrid; the Archivo de Protocolos, Sevilla; the Archivo de Simancas; the Real Academia de Historia, Madrid; the Propaganda Fide Collection, Vatican Library, Rome; the Bancroft Library; Library of Congress and the Newberry Library. The Archivo General de Indias (AGI), housed in Seville, Spain, is the document repository related to the history of the Spanish Empire in the Americas and the Philippines, hence the volume from there. It was created in 1785 by decree of Charles III in order to bring together under a single roof all the documentation regarding the overseas empire, which until that time had been dispersed among various archives. The other archives held documents related to the broader interests of these scholars.

Bloom came to New Mexico in 1912 and besides teaching at UNM, was involved in a variety of organizations in Santa Fe, including the Museum of New Mexico, the School of American Research and the Historical Society of New Mexico. He was a founder and editor of the New Mexico Historical Review, from its inception in 1926 until his death in 1946. He was responsible for most of the selections in the AGI collection. Knowing the early documents for New Mexico had been lost during the Pueblo Revolt, from 1928-1940 he made numerous trips to the archives of Mexico, Spain, and Italy to find information. He located and copied thousands of documents that were hitherto unknown to Southwest historians, depositing them at UNM. To understand New Mexico events, he also collected a considerable amount of material on the northern provinces of Mexico and the surrounding Borderlands.

Scholes came to Albuquerque in 1924, teaching at UNM off and on from 1924 to 1954, and regularly from 1946-1970, when he retired. His areas of interest covered colonial New Mexico, Mexico and Yucatan. He worked for the Library of Congress copying Spanish documents about the U.S. Borderlands in the archives of Mexico. As head of the Carnegie Post-Columbian History Section he searched for Yucatan and Mayan material in the archives of Spain and Mexico. For comparisons, he collected documents about the history of the Caribbean, Central America and Latin America - adding another dimension to this collection. Toward retirement, Scholes focused his research on Cortes. He was Visiting Professor of History at Tulane University until his death in 1979.

Both Bloom and Scholes published scholarly works based on documents from this collection. The New Mexico Historical Review carried articles about their lives and research activities, as well as historical studies by them.

This descriptive guide for the AGI material at the CSWR was the brain child of Robert Himmerich y Valencia, as editor of the New Mexico Historical Review. The initial layout was developed by Felicia Guerra and graduate students from the NMHR office and was later continued by fellows from the CSWR.

From the guide to the Documents from the Archivo General de Indias and other related archives, 1508-1821, 1521-1780, (University of New Mexico Center for Southwest Research)

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http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w67s9c71
Ark ID:
w67s9c71
SNAC ID:
48066236

Subjects:

  • Fransicans--New Mexico
  • Mestizaje
  • Inquisition--Mexico
  • Missionaries
  • New Mexico Historical Review
  • Conversion--Christianity
  • Excavations (Archeology)
  • Pirates--Caribbean
  • Slavery--Mexico--History
  • Pueblo Indians--History--Sources
  • Southwest, New--History
  • Slavery--Mexico--History--Sources
  • Aztecs--History
  • Missionaries--New Mexico
  • Pueblo Indians--History
  • Indians, Treatment of--History--Sources
  • Mexican War, 1846-1848
  • Blacks--Mexico--History--Sources
  • Encomiendas (Latin America)--History--Sources
  • Women--Mexico--History
  • Judges--New Mexico
  • Indians, treatment of
  • Indians of North America--Wars--1866-1895--Personal narratives
  • Hospitals--New Spain--History
  • Historians
  • Christianity--Conversion
  • New Mexico--Description and travel
  • Indians of North America--Social life and customs
  • Mexican War, 1846-1848--New Mexico
  • Archaeology
  • New Mexico--History--Periodicals
  • Inquisition--Mexico--History--Sources
  • Blacks--Mexico--History
  • Missions--Spanish--History--Sources
  • Kearny Expedition, 1845
  • Encomiendas (Latin America)
  • Mexico--History--Spanish colony, 1540-1810--Sources
  • New Mexico--Discovery and exploration--Spanish
  • Hospitals--New Spain--History--Sources
  • Women--Mexico--History--Sources
  • Historical Society of New Mexico
  • Pirates--Caribbean Area--History--Sources
  • Judges
  • Historians--New Mexico
  • New Mexico--History--To 1848

Occupations:

not available for this record

Places:

  • Yucatán (Mexico : State) (as recorded)
  • New Mexico (as recorded)
  • Louisiana (as recorded)
  • California (as recorded)
  • New Mexico (as recorded)
  • Tlaxcala (Mexico : State) -– History (as recorded)
  • Nuevo Leon (Mexico : State) (as recorded)
  • Provincias Internas (New Spain) (as recorded)
  • Coahuila (Mexico: State) (as recorded)
  • New Spain (as recorded)
  • Philippines (as recorded)
  • Coahuila (Mexico : State) (as recorded)
  • Florida (as recorded)
  • Nueva Vizcaya (New Spain) (as recorded)
  • Michoacan (Mexico: State) (as recorded)
  • Nueva Galicia (as recorded)
  • Texas (as recorded)
  • Oaxaca (Mexico : State) (as recorded)
  • California (as recorded)
  • Mexico (as recorded)
  • Martinez Land Grant (N.M.) (as recorded)
  • Guatemala (as recorded)
  • Chaco Canyon (N.M.) (as recorded)
  • New Mexico (as recorded)
  • Guatemala (as recorded)
  • El Paso (Tex.) (as recorded)
  • Nueva Vizcaya (New Spain) (as recorded)
  • Yucatan (as recorded)
  • New Mexico (as recorded)
  • Provincias Internas (New Spain) -– History (as recorded)
  • New Mexico (as recorded)
  • Florida (as recorded)
  • Nuevo Leon (Mexico : State) (as recorded)
  • Peru (Viceroyalty) (as recorded)
  • Sonora (Mexico: State) (as recorded)
  • Martinez Land Grant (N.M.) (as recorded)
  • Alaska (as recorded)
  • Sonora (Mexico : State) -– History (as recorded)
  • Alaska (as recorded)
  • Oaxaca (Mexico: State) (as recorded)
  • Tlaxcala (Mexico: State) (as recorded)
  • Nueva Galicia -– History (as recorded)
  • New Mexico (as recorded)
  • Peru (as recorded)
  • Mexico (as recorded)
  • Mexico (as recorded)
  • Spain (as recorded)
  • New Spain (as recorded)
  • Michoacan (Mexico : State) -– History (as recorded)
  • Spain (as recorded)
  • Texas (as recorded)
  • Louisiana (as recorded)