Duncan, Isadora, 1877-1927

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1877-05-27
Death 1927-09-14
US
Italian, English, German, French, Russian, Dutch; Flemish

Biographical notes:

Isadora Duncan was a dancer and dance teacher who is credited with inventing what came to be known as Modern Dance.

From the description of The Isadora Duncan papers. 1904-1927. (University of Utah). WorldCat record id: 191855381

American dancer.

From the description of Autograph note signed, dated : [n.p., n.d.], to an unidentified recipient, [n.d.]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270873291

Isadora Duncan (1878-1927) was born 27 May 1878 in San Francisco, California, to Joseph Charles and Dora Gray Duncan. She began dancing and teaching dance at the age of six, and made her New York debut at the age of seventeen in a production of A Midsummer Night's Dream . Renowned throughout the world for her techniques and philosophies about dancing. Duncan believed in free and natural movements inspired by the classical Greek arts. She used free-flowing costumes, bare feet and loose hair to restore dancing to a new vitality. Isadora Duncan is also credited with inventing what later came to be known as Modern Dance. Teaching dance to children was also important to her and as a result, Duncan opened up dance schools and taught many children worldwide her techniques and philosophies. She died in Europe in 1927.

From the guide to the Isasora Duncan papers, 1904-1927, (J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah)

Isadora Duncan was a pioneer of "free dance"--The theory that dance was the expression of an inner urge or impulse and reflected the rhythms of nature.

She was born in 1878. Her revolutionary ideas on dance were not well accepted in America, and Duncan left for Europe in 1899 where she enjoyed greater success. In 1904 she founded her own school. In 1925 Duncan moved to France where she began her autobiography and gave occasional performances. In 1927 Duncan was killed in a car accident. Lessons in the Duncan dance technique continued after her death, taught by several of her pupils, also known as the Isadora Duncan Dancers.

From the description of Isadora Duncan dance programs and ephemera, 1900-1957. (University of California, Irvine). WorldCat record id: 48504814

Biography

Isadora Duncan was born in San Francisco on May 27, 1878. She was a pioneer of "free dance" -- the theory that dance was the expression of an inner urge or impulse and reflected the rhythms of nature -- as opposed to the formal dance form of ballet. Her revolutionary ideas on dance were not well accepted in America, and Duncan left for Europe in 1899, where she enjoyed greater success. Her first appearances were from 1900 to 1902 in Paris, Budapest, Vienna, Munich, and Berlin. In 1904 she founded her own school. In 1905 Duncan appeared in Russia for the first time, where she was much admired by advocates of reform of the ballet. In 1925 Duncan moved to France, where she began her autobiography, My Life, and gave occasional performances. She gave her last recital in Paris in July 1927. In Nice, France, on September 14, 1927, Duncan was killed in a car accident. Lessons in the Duncan dance technique continued after her death, and were taught by Irma Duncan (one of Isadora's adopted daughters) and several of her other pupils, who were also known as the Isadora Duncan Dancers.

For further biographical information, see Isadora Duncan, My Life, by Isadora Duncan (New York: Boni and Liveright, 1927). See also Walter Terry, Isadora Duncan: Her Life, Her Art, Her Legacy, (New York: Dodd, Mead & Co., 1964).

From the guide to the Isadora Duncan dance programs and ephemera, 1900-1957, (University of California, Irvine. Library. Special Collections and Archives.)



Biographical notes are generated from the bibliographic and archival source records supplied by data contributors.

Loading...

Loading Relationships

Constellation Information

Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w67945s0
SNAC ID:
14193612

Subjects:

  • Dancers--United States--History--Sources
  • Modern dance--History--Sources
  • Dancers--History--Sources
  • Performing Arts
  • Dance--Archival resources
  • Modern dance--Archival resources.
  • Dance--Archival resources.
  • Correspondence
  • Material Types
  • Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences
  • Modern dance--Archival resources

Occupations:

  • Dance teachers.
  • Dancers.

Places:

  • United States (as recorded)