Buckley, William F., Jr., 1925-2008

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1925-11-24
Death 2008-02-27
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

Epithet: jr of the National Review

British Library Archives and Manuscripts Catalogue : Person : Description : ark:/81055/vdc_100000001186.0x000169

William F. Buckley, Jr. was born in 1925 and graduated from Yale University in 1950. In 1955 he founded the magazine The National Review. He also wrote a nationally syndicated column and hosted the weekly television show Firing Line from 1966 through 1999. In 1965 Buckley ran unsuccessfully as the Conservative Party candidate for mayor of New York City. From 1969 to 1972 he served on the Advisory Commission on Information of the United States Information Agency. He wrote numerous books including God and Man at Yale, espionage novels, and a trilogy based on his sailing expeditions. Buckley died on February 27, 2008, at his home in Stamford, Connecticut.

From the description of William F. Buckley, Jr. papers, 1951-2008 (inclusive). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 702156596

Born in the New York City borough of Manhattan, William Frank Buckley, Jr. (1925-2008) was the sixth of ten children of William Frank and Aloise Steiner Buckley. After prep school, Buckley studied Spanish at the University of Mexico and served in the U. S. Army from 1944 to 1946. In 1950, he graduated from Yale with honors having studied political science, economics, and history. Buckley worked briefly for the CIA before becoming a freelance writer and lecturer. In 1955, he founded the influential magazine National Review, credited as the foundation of mainstream conservative thought. From 1966 to 1999, Buckley hosted political and cultural debates on Firing Line, one of television's longest running programs. The author of over 50 books, Buckley also wrote the twice-weekly syndicated newspaper column, "On the Right."

Source:

"William F. Buckley Jr. Is Dead at 82." New York Times, February 27, 2008.

From the guide to the William F. Buckley, Firing Line, Catalog 2001-172., 1999, (Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin)

Born in the New York City borough of Manhattan, William Frank Buckley, Jr. (1925-2008) was the sixth of ten children of William Frank and Aloise Steiner Buckley.

After prep school, Buckley studied Spanish at the University of Mexico and served in the U. S. Army from 1944 to 1946. In 1950, he graduated from Yale with honors having studied political science, economics, and history. Buckley worked briefly for the CIA before becoming a freelance writer and lecturer. In 1955, he founded the influential magazine National Review, credited as the foundation of mainstream conservative thought. From 1966 to 1999, Buckley hosted political and cultural debates on Firing Line, one of television's longest running programs. The author of over 50 books, Buckley also wrote the twice-weekly syndicated newspaper column, "On the Right."

From the description of William F. Buckley Firing Line Catalog, 1999 (University of Texas Libraries). WorldCat record id: 761942467

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Subjects:

  • Conservatism--United States--History--20th century
  • Public television--History--20th century
  • Journalism--History
  • Television programs
  • Firing line (Television program)
  • Public television--United States--History--20th century
  • Conservatism--History--20th century
  • Political Campaigns
  • Journalism--United States--History
  • Conservatism

Occupations:

  • Editors
  • Journalists
  • Television journalists
  • Authors
  • Television personalities

Places:

  • New York, NY, US
  • United States, 00, US
  • Stamford, CT, US