Kahn, Louis I., 1901-1974

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1901-02-20
Death 1974-03-17
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

Louis I. Kahn was born in Estonia and raised in Philadelphia. He was trained in architecture in the Beaux-Arts tradition at the University of Pennsylvania under Paul Philippe Cret. As a mature architect, Kahn was distinguished from his contemporaries (in a period dominated by the International Style) by his unique personal philosophy of architecture and a style marked by a profound sense of history and pure geometry in design and the texture of materials in construction. His legacy is as much in his teaching and his unbuilt designs as in his major built works. He lectured and wrote on architecture beginning in the 1930s. He taught at Yale University from 1947 to 1955 and was Cret Professor of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania from 1956 until his death.

From the description of Architectural drawings for the Kitnick House, Louis I. Kahn, architect 1948-1949. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 245047934

From the description of Louis I. Kahn portrait of Dr. Charles Burr, ca. 1935. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 232996036

Louis I. Kahn was born in Estonia and raised in Philadelphia. He was trained in architecture in the Beaux-Arts tradition at the University of Pennsylvania under Paul Philippe Cret. As a mature architect, Kahn was distinguished from his contemporaries (in a period dominated by the International Style) by his unique personal philosophy of architecture and a style marked by a profound sense of history and pure geometry in design and the texture of materials in construction. His legacy is as much in his teaching and his unbuilt designs as in his major built works. He lectured and wrote on architecture beginning in the 1930s. He taught at Yale University (1947-1955) and was Cret Professor of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania from 1956 until his death. Neal Thompson was on the staff of Kahn's architectural office. He is the presumed photographer.

From the description of Louis I Kahn drawing of the Mikveh Israel Synagogue, 1964. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 233042914

Architect; b. Island of Osel, Russia, brought to U.S., 1905, naturalized, 1915; B. Arch., U. Pa., 1924; private practice architecture, 1953-1974; prof. architecture, U. Pa., 1957-1974, named to Paul Philippe Cret chair in architecture, 1966-1971, emeritus, 1971-1974; prof. architecture, Yale, 1952-1957; among his principal works are the Yale Art Gallery and the Yale Center for British Art.

From the description of Louis Isadore Kahn collection, 1951-1978 (inclusive), 1962-1977 (bulk). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 702166532

From the guide to the Louis Isadore Kahn collection, 1951-1978, 1962-1977, (Manuscripts and Archives)

The First Unitarian Congregational Society of Rochester, New York was established in 1829. In 1959 the Congregation commissioned architect Louis I. Kahn (1901-1974) to design what would become its fourth home. The new church and school was dedicated on November 18, 1962. A later addition, also designed by Kahn, was completed in 1969 to house additional meeting rooms for the church's school.

From the description of Louis I. Kahn architectural records for the First Unitarian Church, Rochester, New York, 1959-1967. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122543490

Louis I. Kahn was born in Estonia and raised in Philadelphia. He was trained in architecture in the Beaux-Arts tradition at the University of Pennsylvania under Paul Philippe Cret. As a mature architect, Kahn was distinguished from his contemporaries (in a period dominated by the International Style) by his unique personal philosophy of architecture and a style marked by a profound sense of history and pure geometry in design and the texture of materials in construction. His legacy is as much in his teaching and his unbuilt designs as in his major built works. He lectured and wrote on architecture beginning in the 1930s. He taught at Yale University (1947-1955) and was Cret Professor of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania from 1956 until his death.

From the description of Louis I. Kahn sketches for the Kimbell Art Museum, 1967-1969. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 232990313

Kahn was retained by the Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley, Calif. as the architect to design the projected Common Library building. He completed preliminary designs prior to his unexpected death in 1974.

From the description of Conceptual Drawing of a Floor Plan for the Graduate Theological Union Common Library, ca. 1973. (Graduate Theological Union). WorldCat record id: 49675718

From the description of Conceptual Drawing of the Graduate Theological Union Common Library, ca. 1973. (Graduate Theological Union). WorldCat record id: 49675687

Louis I. Kahn was born in Estonia and raised in Philadelphia. He was trained in architecture in the Beaux-Arts tradition at the University of Pennsylvania under Paul Philippe Cret. As a mature architect, Kahn was distinguished from his contemporaries (in a period dominated by the International Style) by his unique personal philosophy of architecture and a style marked by a profound sense of history and pure geometry in design and the texture of materials in construction. His legacy is as much in his teaching and his unbuilt designs as in his major built works. He lectured and wrote on architecture beginning in the 1930s. He taught at Yale University (1947-1955) and was Cret Professor of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania from 1956 until his death.

Kahn's major built works include: Yale University Art Gallery; Alfred Newton Richards Medical Research Building, University of Pennsylvania; Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California; First Unitarian Church and School, Rochester, New York; Performing Arts Theater, Fort Wayne, Indiana; Eleanor Donnelley Erdman Hall, Bryn Mawr College; Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad, India; Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Capital of Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh; Library, Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire; Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas; Yale Center for British Art. When Kahn died unexpectedly of a heart attack in 1974, two of his most important works, the Yale Center for British Art and the national capital of Bangladesh at Dhaka, were still under construction. After his death, his office was closed, but his former associates completed, when possible, the projects under construction.

From the description of Louis I. Kahn architectural records and personal papers, ca. 1908-1984. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122491278

Louis I. Kahn was born in Estonia and raised in Philadelphia. He was trained in architecture in the Beaux-Arts tradition at the University of Pennsylvania under Paul Philippe Cret. As a mature architect, Kahn was distinguished from his contemporaries (in a period dominated by the International Style) by his unique personal philosophy of architecture and a style marked by a profound sense of history and pure geometry in design and the texture of materials in construction. His legacy is as much in his teaching and his unbuilt designs as in his major built works. He lectured and wrote on architecture beginning in the 1930s. He taught at Yale University (1947-1955) and was Cret Professor of Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania from 1956 until his death.

Kahn designed and built a new building for Temple Beth-El of Northern Westchester, located in Chappaqua, New York, from 1966 to 1972. Leonard Feldman, a practicing architect, served on the congregation's Building Committee. He was born on May 4, 1921 in New York City and served in the Air Force during World War II. He received the degree of B. Arch. in 1947 from New York University and worked for a number of firms before establishing his own practice in White Plains, New York.

From the description of Papers related to Temple Beth-El, Chappaqua, NY, Louis I. Kahn, Architect, 1966-1970. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 245118149

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Subjects:

  • Eleanor Donnelley Erdman Hall (Bryn Mawr, Pa.)
  • College buildings--Designs and plans
  • Art museums--Designs and plans
  • Public buildings
  • Architecture--Study and teaching
  • Architects--Archives
  • Library architecture--Designs and plans
  • Alfred Newton Richards Medical Research Building (Philadelphia, Pa.)
  • Architecture--History--20th century--Designs and plans
  • Architecture--20th century
  • Architecture, American--20th century
  • Architectural design--History--20th century--Sources
  • Architectural Drawings
  • Performing Arts Theater (Fort Wayne, Ind.)
  • Architectural design--Study and teaching--History--Sources
  • Architecture, Modern

Occupations:

  • Architect

Places:

  • Fort Worth (Tex.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • California--Berkeley (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • India (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Bangladesh (as recorded)
  • Sher-e-Bangla Nagar (Dhaka, Bangladesh) (as recorded)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.) (as recorded)
  • Rochester, (N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • California--Berkeley (as recorded)