Steig, William, 1907-2003

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1907-11-14
Death 2003-10-03
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

American cartoonist, author and illustrator of children's books; winner of the Caldecott Award (1970) for Sylvester and the Magic Pebble.

From the description of Roland the minstrel pig : production material, 1967-1968. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis). WorldCat record id: 62452334

From the description of The bad island : production material, 1969. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis). WorldCat record id: 62444911

From the description of C D B! : production material, 1968-1969. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis). WorldCat record id: 62495571

From the description of Poor Pearl : production material, [196-?] (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 78624322

From the description of Papers, [ca. 1955]-1977 (1967-1977). (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis). WorldCat record id: 62681449

From the description of The bad speller : production material, [ca. 1970]. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis). WorldCat record id: 62681448

From the description of An eye for elephants : production material, [ca. 1969]. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis). WorldCat record id: 62373865

From the description of Sylvester and the magic pebble : production material, 1968-1977. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis). WorldCat record id: 62373866

William Steig was born on November 14, 1907, in New York City. He worked regularly as a cartoonist, primarily contributing to the New Yorker, as well as to various advertising agencies and greeting card companies. Steig did not write his first children's book until 1968, long after he had become famous as a cartoonist. His third book, Sylvester and the Magic Pebble (1969), is not only one of his best-loved but also one of his most celebrated and received seven honors, including a National Book Award finalist and the 1970 Caldecott Medal. He later received Caldecott Honors for The Amazing Bone (1976) and twice received Newbery Honors: first for Abel's Island (1976) and later for Doctor De Soto (1982). Steig wrote more than forty books and published hundreds of cartoons over his long career. Today, he is probably best remembered for one of his later books: Shrek! (1991) was adapted into an enormously successful film franchise. He continued writing for children well into his nineties, and died in Boston on October 3, 2003.

From the description of William Steig illustrations, circa 1969. (Franklin & Marshall College). WorldCat record id: 779492234

William Steig was born on November 14, 1907, in New York City. He grew up in the Bronx and attended City College (now part of CUNY) and the National Academy of Design. The stock market crash put an end to his schooling, and his first cartoon was published in the New Yorker a few months later, in June 1930. He worked regularly as a cartoonist, primarily contributing to the New Yorker, as well as for various advertising agencies and greeting card companies.

Steig did not write his first children’s book until 1968, long after he had become famous as a cartoonist. His third book, Sylvester and the Magic Pebble (1969), is not only one of his best-loved but also one of his most celebrated. It tells the story of Sylvester, a young donkey who collects unusual pebbles, and one day finds a magical pebble that grants wishes. Sylvester is then frightened by a lion and unthinkingly wishes he were a rock so he could remain safe. Now trapped, Sylvester must wait until his family picnics nearby, finding the magic pebble and restoring Sylvester to donkey form. Sylvester received seven honors, including a National Book Award finalist and the 1970 Caldecott Medal. He later received Caldecott Honors for The Amazing Bone (1976) and twice received Newbery Honors: first for Abel’s Island (1976) and later for Doctor De Soto (1982).

Steig wrote more than forty books and published hundreds of cartoons over his long career. Today, he is probably best remembered for one of his later books: Shrek! (1991) was adapted into an enormously successful film franchise. He continued writing for children well into his nineties, and died in Boston on October 3, 2003.

Bibliography:

Angell, Roger. “William Steig.” The New Yorker, October 20, 2003.

Something About the Author, vol. 111.

“William Steig.” Contemporary Authors Online . Detroit: Gale, 2007.

From the guide to the William Steig illustrations, circa 1969, (Free Library of Philadelphia: Children's Literature Research Collection)

William Steig was born November 14, 1907, in New York City. He attended City College of New York (1923-25) and the National Academy of Design (1925-29), and began his career as a cartoonist for The New Yorker in 1930. His first children's books were published in 1968. His third children's book, Sylvester and the Magic Pebble won the 1970 Caldecott Medal, the first of many awards for his work in children's literature. Successful characterizations, expressive drawings, and dry wit characterize Steig's work. He is also the creator of the Poor Pitiful Pearl doll which appeared in the 1950s, and claimed credit for producing the first studio-card or contemporary greeting card line.

Biographical Sources: Something About the Author, vols. 18, 70, 111, 149 Children's Literature Review, vol. 15

From the guide to the William Steig Papers, c. 1955-1977, (University of Minnesota Libraries Children's Literature Research Collections [clrc])

Loading...

Loading Relationships

Information

Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w65q51cv
Ark ID:
w65q51cv
SNAC ID:
76553829

Subjects:

  • Limericks
  • Minstrels--Juvenile fiction
  • Donkeys--Juvenile fiction
  • Children's authors, American--20th century--Archives
  • Donkeys--Fiction
  • English language--Spelling
  • Limericks, Juvenile
  • Minstrels--Fiction
  • Wishes--Fiction
  • Children's literature--Manuscripts
  • Illustration of books--20th century
  • English language--Orthography and spelling--Humor
  • Children's literature, American
  • Orphans--Juvenile fiction
  • Word games--Juvenile literature
  • Wishes--Juvenile fiction
  • Children's authors--20th century
  • Orphans--Fiction
  • Pigs--Fiction
  • Children's literature--20th century
  • Fantasy
  • Games
  • Swine--Juvenile fiction
  • Word games
  • Illustrated children's books--20th century

Occupations:

  • Illustrator
  • Artists
  • Authors

Places:

not available for this record