Radin, Paul, 1883-1959

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1883-04-02
Death 1959-02-21
Americans
English, Siouan languages

Biographical notes:

Dr. Paul Radin is considered to be one of the formative influences in contemporary anthropology and ethnography in the United States and Europe. He was born in Lodz (Russian Poland) on April 2, 1883, the son of a reform rabbi and scholar. In 1884, his family moved to Elmira, New York, and then to New York City in 1890. Educated in the public school system, Radin entered the College of the City of New York as a sub-freshman at the age of fourteen, graduating in 1902. After a brief stint in graduate studies at Columbia exploring the zoology of fish, Radin went to study physical anthropology in Munich. This two-year period afforded him time in Germany, Switzerland and Italy, where he began a process of self-cultivation. He returned to Columbia in 1907 with a major in anthropology and a minor in statistics under the famed professor Franz Boas, the so-called "Father of American Anthropology." Receiving his Ph.D. in 1911, Radin took a series of appointments around North America, first with the Bureau of American Ethnology (1911-12), then a joint fellowship from Columbia and Harvard to study the Zapotec culture (1912-13), followed by four years with the Geological Survey of Canada, studying the Ojibwa of southeast Ontario. His ancillary work on the Winnebago culminated in his Autobiography of The Winnebego Indian in 1920. From 1920-1925, he wrote and did field research at the University of Cambridge, publishing Primitive Man as Philosopher in 1927. From 1927 to 1930, while at Fisk University in Nashville, Radin collected oral histories of former slaves' conversion experiences, many of which remain unpublished. During the Great Depression, Radin moved to Berkeley, where he remained until 1941. From 1930 to 1940, Radin accomplished three major feats: an analysis of the Patwin language of California, his survey of San Francisco's Minorities in 1934-1935 for the State Economic Recovery Act (S.E.R.A. Project 2-F2-98 (3-F2-145)), and the monumental Catalogue of Mexican Pamphlets in the Sutro Collection of the California State Library in 1939 for the Works Progress Administration (W.P.A. project 665-08-3-236). During these trying years of the Depression, Radin still managed to publish Social Anthropology (1932), Method and Theory of Ethnology (1933), and Primitive Religion (1937) at a time when publication, especially in academia, was curtailed. After 1949, Radin lectured in Oxford, Cambridge and Carl Jung's Institute in Zurich. Working from Bollingen Foundation grants, he continued his research on the Winnebago. He joined Brandeis University in 1957, where he worked until his death on February 21, 1959 in New York City.

From the description of Paul Radin papers 1933-2000 1934 - 1935 (San Francisco Public Library). WorldCat record id: 659806675

Paul Radin was an anthropologist and researched the language and folklore of North American and Mexican Indians, the Winnebago, Ojibwa, and Zapotec in particular.

From the description of Papers, [ca. 1912-1959]. (American Philosophical Society Library). WorldCat record id: 122380117

Anthropologist Paul Radin researched the language and folklore of North American and Mexican Indians, the Winnebago, Ojibwa, and Zapotec in particular.

From the guide to the Paul Radin papers, [ca. 1912-1959], Circa 1912-1959, (American Philosophical Society)

Radin was born on Apr. 2, 1883 in Lodz in Russian Poland; came to the US as an infant; BA, College of the City of New York, 1902; Ph. D, Columbia Univ., 1911; in 1912 became a field ethnologist at the Geological Survey of Canada; became an ethnologist specializing in the study of the Winnebago; publications include Winnebago tales (1910), The Peyote cult of the Winnebago (1913), and Literary aspects of North American mythology (1915); he died on Feb. 21, 1959.

From the description of Papers, 1940. (University of California, Los Angeles). WorldCat record id: 40859580

Anthropologist.

Radin was an alumnus of City College, Class of 1902.

From the description of Memorabilia, 1926-1947. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 155503617

Biography

Radin was born on April 2, 1883 in Lodz in Russian Poland; came to the U.S. as an infant; BA, College of the City of New York, 1902; Ph.D, Columbia University, 1911; in 1912 became a field ethnologist at the Geological Survey of Canada; became an ethnologist specializing in the study of the Winnebago; publications include Winnebago tales (1910), The Peyote cult of the Winnebago (1913), and Literary aspects of North American mythology (1915); he died on February 21, 1959.

From the guide to the Paul Radin Papers, 1940, (University of California, Los Angeles. Library. Department of Special Collections.)

Biography

Dr. Paul Radin is considered to be one of the formative influences in contemporary anthropology and ethnography in the United States and Europe. He was born in Lodz (Russian Poland) on April 2, 1883, the son of a reform rabbi and scholar. In 1884, his family moved to Elmira, New York, and then to New York City in 1890. Educated in the public school system, Radin entered the College of the City of New York as a sub-freshman at the age of fourteen, graduating in 1902. After a brief stint in graduate studies at Columbia exploring the zoology of fish, Radin went to study physical anthropology in Munich. This two-year period afforded him time in Germany, Switzerland and Italy, where he began a process of self-cultivation. He returned to Columbia in 1907 with a major in anthropology and a minor in statistics under the famed professor Franz Boas, the so-called "Father of American Anthropology." Receiving his Ph.D. in 1911, Radin took a series of appointments around North America, first with the Bureau of American Ethnology (1911-12), then a joint fellowship from Columbia and Harvard to study the Zapotec culture (1912-13), followed by four years with the Geological Survey of Canada, studying the Ojibwa of southeast Ontario. His ancillary work on the Winnebago culminated in his Autobiography of The Winnebego Indian in 1920.

From 1920-1925, he wrote and did field research at the University of Cambridge, publishing Primitive Man as Philosopher in 1927. From 1927 to 1930, while at Fisk University in Nashville, Radin collected oral histories of former slaves' conversion experiences, many of which remain unpublished.

During the Great Depression, Radin moved to Berkeley, where he remained until 1941. From 1930 to 1940, Radin accomplished three major feats: an analysis of the Patwin language of California, his Survey of San Francisco's Minorities in 1934-1935 for the State Economic Recovery Act (SERA Project 2-F2-98 (3-F2-145)), and the monumental Catalogue of Mexican Pamphlets in the Sutro Collection of the California State Library in 1939 for the Works Progress Administration (WPA project 665-08-3-236). During these trying years of the Depression, Radin still managed to publish Social Anthropology (1932), Method and Theory of Ethnology (1933), and Primitive Religion (1937) at a time when publication--especially in academia--was curtailed.

After 1949, Radin lectured in Oxford, Cambridge and Carl Jung's Institute in Zurich. Working from Bollingen Foundation grants, he continued his research on the Winnebago. He joined Brandeis University in 1957, where he worked until his death on February 21, 1959 in New York City.

From the guide to the Paul Radin Papers, 1933-2000, 1934-1935, (San Francisco History Center, San Francisco Public Library)

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Subjects:

  • Tukuarika Indians
  • Indians of North America--Michigan
  • Anthropology
  • Ottawa Indians--Folklore
  • Ethnology--California--San Francisco Bay Area
  • Italians--California--San Francisco Bay Area
  • Tukudh Indians
  • Chinese Americans--California--San Francisco Bay Area--Folklore
  • Ottawa Indians--Religion
  • Indians of North America--Wisconsin--Wars
  • Wappo dialect
  • Winnebago language
  • Zapotec language
  • Winnebago Indians--Rites and ceremonies
  • Ojibwa Indians--Religion
  • Ottawa Indians--Social life and customs
  • Eastern Woodlands Indians
  • Ethnologists--Archival resources
  • Folklore
  • Anthropology--Research
  • Winnebago language--Texts
  • Winnebago mythology
  • Watercolor drawings
  • Chinese
  • Ojibwa Indians
  • Chippewa Indinas--Social life and customs
  • Depressions--1929--California--San Francisco Bay Area
  • Ethnology
  • Chinese--California--San Francisco Bay Area
  • Menominee Indians--History
  • Translating and interpreting
  • Minorities
  • Indians of Mexico--Languages
  • Indians of North America--Folklore
  • Winnebago Indian--Folklore
  • Indians of North America--Languages
  • Winnebago Indians--Social life and customs
  • Fox language
  • Winnebago language--Glossaries, vocabularies, etc
  • Chinese Americans--Folklore
  • Wintun languages
  • Ojibwa Indians--Social life and customs
  • Ojibwa Indians--Michigan--Folklore
  • Immigrants
  • African Americans--Folklore
  • Winnebago Indians--Religion
  • Pomo language
  • Depressions--1929
  • Ojibwa Indians--Folklore
  • Huave language
  • Winnebago Indians
  • Italian Americans
  • Minorities--California--San Francisco Bay Area
  • Anthropological linguistics
  • Italians
  • African Americans--Religion
  • Italian Americans--California--San Francisco Bay Area
  • Immigrants--California--San Francisco Bay Area
  • Prophets
  • Winnebago Indians--History

Occupations:

  • Anthropologists
  • Ethnologists--Archival resources

Places:

  • San Francisco (Calif.) (as recorded)
  • California--San Francisco (as recorded)
  • San Francisco (Calif.) (as recorded)
  • California--San Francisco Bay Area (as recorded)