Pendleton, Edmund, 1721-1803

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1721-09-09
Death 1803-10-23

Biographical notes:

Edmund Pendleton (1721-1803) was born in Caroline County, Virginia, and died in Richmond. He was a statesman and member of the Continental Congress of 1774. The recipient of this letter, Francis Preston (1765-1835), was the son of William Preston, who accompanied Washington on several exploring expeditions in the West. Francis studied law under George Wythe, and practiced in Montgomery, Washington, and other counties. He was a friend of Madison, Monroe, Jefferson, and Chief Justice Marshall. He married Sarah, the daughter of William Campbell, the hero of King's Mountain.

From the description of Letter : Richmond, to Francis Preston, Montgomery, 1790 July 12. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 145409541

Edmund Pendleton was born 9 September 1721 in Caroline County, Virginia, to Henry Pendleton (1683-1721) and Mary Taylor Pendleton (1688-1770). He married first Elizabeth Roy 21 January 1741/2 and she died in childbirth 17 November 1742. Pendleton then married Sarah Pollard (1725-1815) in June 1743. Pendleton was licensed to practice law in front of the general court in 1745, and was appointed a justice for Caroline County in 1751. He was elected to the House of Burgesses in 1752. Pendleton was a member of all five Virginia Conventions in 1775-1776, and was a member of the 1788 convention and supported ratifying the federal Constitution. Pendleton died in Richmond, Virginia, 26 October 1803.

From the guide to the Edmund Pendleton Letters, 1773-1800, (The Library of Virginia)

Edmund Pendleton (September 9, 1721 – October 23, 1803) was a Virginia politician, lawyer and judge, active in the American Revolutionary War.

From the guide to the Letter to John Page, 1775 December 13, (John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation)

From the guide to the Letter to James Madison, 1799 May 12, (John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation)

From the guide to the Edmund Pendleton Letter, 1786 October 27, (John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation)

Continental Congressman, jurist, president of Virginia Convention to ratify the U.S. Constitution.

From the description of ALS, 1778 November 16 : Caroline, to Col. William Preston, Montgomery. (Copley Press, J S Copley Library). WorldCat record id: 13858868

Edmund Pendleton (1721-1803), of Caroline County, Virginia, served as President of the Virginia Provincial Congress, was a member of the First Continental Congress, and authored the resolution introducing the Declaration of Independence.

From the guide to the Edmund Pendleton Letters, ., 1776-1779, (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Library. Southern Historical Collection.)

Delegate to the Continental Congress, jurist and public official of Virginia.

From the description of Letter of Edmund Pendleton, 1776. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 79452207

Virginia jurist and legislator.

From the description of Edmund Pendleton letter to Richard Henry Lee [manuscript], 1778 July 27. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647859393

From the description of Letter : Caroline County, Va., to Richard Henry Lee 1778 July 27. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 34931245

Edmund Pendleton was an important figure in the American Revolution. He held many offices, serving in the Continental Congresses and as chief justice of the Supreme Court of Virginia.

From the description of Papers, 1772-1800. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122481803

Edmund Pendleton (1721-1803), son of Henry Pendleton and Mary Taylor, married Elizabeth Roy in 1741 and Sarah Pollard in 1743 or 1745. Trained as a lawyer, he served as a justice of the peace (1751-77) and burgess (1752-74) from Caroline County, Virginia. Pendleton was a representative to the first and second Continental Congresses, chair of the House of Delegates, and in 1779 the President of the Supreme Court of Appeals.

William Baynham (1749-1814), a native Virginian, left America to study and practice medicine in England. When he returned to Virginia in 1785, Baynham settled in Essex County, adjacent to Caroline County, where he practiced medicine. He married Virginia Matthews in 1810.

John Taylor (1753-1824) was sent to live with his uncle Edmund Pendleton (1721-1803) when he was six years old after his father died. After attending the College of William and Mary, Taylor returned to Edmundsburg to study law with his uncle and was admitted to the Caroline County bar in 1774. Taylor served in the revolutionary war, House of Delegates, and United States Senate. He retired from legal practice in 1791 to farm.

From the description of Copy of will of Edmund Pendleton of Edmundsburg, Virginia, 1799. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122611625

Edmund Pendleton (1721-1803) was a lawyer, justice of the peace (1751-77), and burgess (1752-74) in Caroline County, Virginia. He was a representative to the first and second Continental Congresses, chair of the Virginia House of Delegates, and President of the Supreme Court of Appeals of Virginia.

John Taylor (1753-1824) was sent to live with his uncle, Edmund Pendleton, at age six, with whom he later studied law. He served in the revolutionary war, the Virginia House of Delegates, and the U.S. Senate. Taylor retired from his legal practice in 1791 to farm.

From the description of History of Col. John Taylor of Caroline County, Virginia and Communication, 1800. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122538408

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Subjects:

  • Executors and administrators--History--18th century
  • New Gate Plantation (Va.)
  • Legislators--United States--Biography--Constitutional period - 1789-1809
  • Court records--18th century
  • Courts--officials and employees
  • Lead mines and mining
  • Foreign ministers--History--18th century
  • Money
  • Extinguishment of debts--18th century
  • Canadian invasion, 1775-1776
  • Slaves--Emancipation--History
  • Slavery--Antislavery movements--History
  • Land use
  • Wills--18th century
  • Wills--Virginia--Culpeper County
  • Legislators--Correspondence, reminiscences, etc.--Constitutional period, 1789-1809
  • Executors and administrators--Virginia--History - 18th century

Occupations:

  • Jurists
  • Delegates, U.S. Continental Congress--Virginia
  • Public officials--Virginia

Places:

  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Maryland (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Europe (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Maryland (as recorded)
  • Virginia - Militia - Ordnance and ordnance stores (as recorded)
  • Maryland (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Europe (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States - History - Revolution - 1775-1783 - Economic aspects (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Virginia - History - Revolution - 1775-1783 - Economic aspects (as recorded)
  • Virginia--Culpeper County (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)