Turner, Frederick Jackson, 1861-1932

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1861-11-14
Death 1932-03-14
US
English

Biographical notes:

Frederick Jackson Turner, professor and historian, became a leading scholar after he published, in 1893, "The Significance of the Frontier in American History," his revolutionary thesis that American society owed its distincitve characteristics to experience with an undeveloped frontier. He was born on November 14, 1861 in Portage, Wisconsin, the son of Andrew Jackson Turner, a journalist and politician. His scholary work was first carried on at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, where he taught from 1891 to 1910 as well as Johns Hopkins University. In later years he joined Harvard, retiring from there in 1924 and spending his last years as a research associate at the Huntington Library. Turner, president of the American Historical Association in 1909-1910, is also remembered for his work on the significance of sectionalism in American history. Turner married Caroline Mae Sherwood of Chicago in 1889; they had three children, two died in childhood. Turner's daughter, Dorothy Kinsley Main, was the mother of historian Jackson Turner Main, who like his grandfather studied at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Frederick Jackson Turner died in Pasadena, California on March 14, 1932

From the description of Letters of Frederick Jackson Turner, 1923. (Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens). WorldCat record id: 733953599

Turner, an American historian, was born on November 14, 1861 in Portage, Wisconsin. He was educated at the University of Wisconsin and was awarded his doctorate in 1891 from Johns Hopkins University. He taught at the University of Wisconsin until 1910 when accepted a position at Harvard University. After his retirement from Harvard in 1924, he moved to San Marino, California and lived there until his death on March 14, 1932.

From the description of Frederick Jackson Turner papers [microform], 1862-1932. (University of California, Santa Barbara). WorldCat record id: 213726885

Frederick Jackson Turner (1861-1932) was an American historian. He graduated with a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1884, obtained his Ph.D. in history from Johns Hopkins University in 1890, and was a professor of history at Wisconsin from1890-1910. Turner was a professor of history at Harvard University from 1911-1924. He is best known for his The Significance of the Frontier in American History.

From the description of Frederick Jackson Turner correspondence, 1889-1927. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 612371046

Frederick Jackson Turner, professor and historian, became a leading scholar after he published, in 1893, "The Significance of the Frontier in American History," his revolutionary thesis that American society owed its distincitve characteristics to experience with an undeveloped frontier. He was born on November 14, 1861 in Portage, Wisconsin, the son of Andrew Jackson Turner, a journalist and politician. His scholary work was first carried on at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, where he taught from 1891 to 1910 as well as Johns Hopkins University. In later years he joined Harvard, retiring from there in 1924 and spending his last years as a research associate at the Huntington Library. Turner, president of the American Historical Association in 1909-1910, is also remembered for his work on the significance of sectionalism in American history. Turner married Caroline Mae Sherwood of Chicago in 1889; they had three children, two died in childhood. Turner's daughter, Dorothy Kinsley Main, was the mother of historian Jackson Turner Main, who like his grandfather studied at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Frederick Jackson Turner died in Pasadena, California on March 14, 1932.

From the description of Letter to George Frederick Howe, 1926, July 28. (Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens). WorldCat record id: 733967249

From the description of Papers of Frederick Jackson Turner, 1862-1976 (bulk 1889-1932). (Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens). WorldCat record id: 691986914

Turner received an honorary degree from Harvard in 1909 and taught history at Harvard.

From the description of Papers of Frederick Jackson Turner, 1910-1924 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 76972907

Frederick Jackson Turner (1861–1932) was an American historian. He graduated with a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1884, obtained his Ph.D. in history from Johns Hopkins University in 1890, and was a professor of history at Wisconsin from1890-1910. Turner was a professor of history at Harvard University from 1911-1924. He is best known for his The Significance of the Frontier in American History.

From the guide to the Frederick Jackson Turner correspondence, 1889-1927., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

Biographical Data

Frederick Jackson Turner, the American historian, is best known for his frontier hypothesis, which has a lasting impact on historical thought in the United States, and for the outstanding quality of his teaching. He was born November 14, 1861, in Portage, Wisconsin, the son of Andrew Jackson Turner, a journalist and politician who was a local historian as well. After study at the University of Wisconsin and Johns Hopkins, Turner embarked on a teaching career in American history, first (1889-1910) at the University of Wisconsin and later (1910-1924) at Harvard. With the publication in 1893 of his essay "The Significance of the Frontier in American History" he became a figure of national importance historically. Though he wrote little, he was active in American Historical Association, and he was a highly stimulating guide and mentor to the future historians who passed through his classroom. His final years were spent in research at the Huntington Library, where his activities became increasingly curtailed as his health deteriorated. He died in Pasadena March 14, 1932.

Turner was married November 25, 1889 to Caroline Mae Sherwood of Chicago. Of their three children, two died in childhood. The third, Dorothy Kinsley (Turner) Main, and his wife survived him.

From the guide to the Frederick Jackson Turner Collection, 1862-1963 (bulk: 1889-1932), (The Huntington Library)

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http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w64x5p84
Ark ID:
w64x5p84
SNAC ID:
55004779

Subjects:

  • Elections--1868-
  • Government publications
  • Historians--19th century
  • Gerrymandering
  • Land titles--Registration and transfer
  • Fur trade
  • Historians--20th century
  • Frontier and pioneer life
  • Sectionalism (United States)
  • Historians
  • German Americans
  • Social history--19th century
  • Historians--Correspondence
  • History--Study and teaching
  • Frontier thesis

Occupations:

not available for this record

Places:

  • Portage (Wis.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Columbia County (Wis.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Wisconsin--Portage (as recorded)
  • West (U.S.) (as recorded)
  • Wisconsin (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Portage County (Wis.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Fort Winnebago (Wis.) (as recorded)
  • West (U.S.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Wisconsin (as recorded)
  • West (U.S.) (as recorded)