Woodruff, Wilford, 1807-1898

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1807-03-01
Death 1898-09-02
English

Biographical notes:

Mormon genealogist, temple recorder, historian, and member of the Utah Militia. He died in 1906.

From the guide to the Moses Franklin Farnsworth papers, 1870-1900, (L. Tom Perry Special Collections)

Wilford Woodruff (1807-1898) was the fourth President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

From the description of Papers, 1873-1903. (Brigham Young University). WorldCat record id: 51605992

Fourth President of the Mormon Church.

From the description of Letter, 1888. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122494645

From the guide to the Wilford Woodruff letter, 1888, (L. Tom Perry Special Collections)

Fourth president of the Mormon Church, who issued the proclamation that relinquished the church practice of polygyny.

From the description of Letter, 1845. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122414798

Fourth president of the Mormon Church. He served several terms in the Utah Territorial legislature and acted as Mormon Church historian for many years.

From the description of Correspondence, 1838. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 145435449

From the guide to the Wilford Woodruff correspondence, 1838, (L. Tom Perry Special Collections)

Wilford Woodruff was born 1 March 1807 in Farmington, Connecticut, to Aphek and Beulah Thompson Woodruff. He was baptized on 31 December 1833, married Phebe (Phoebe) W. Carter in 1837, and became a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in 1839. He traveled widely in America and Great Britain as a missionary; served in political, civic and business positions in Utah; and was intimately involved in historical endeavors, serving as both assistant Church historian and Church historian. He succeeded John Taylor as Church president in 1887. Woodruff died in San Francisco, California, 2 September 1898.

From the guide to the MS 1352 Wilford Woodruff journals and papers 1828-1898 (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Church History Library)

Wilford Woodruff was born 1 March 1807 in Farmington, Connecticut, the son of Aphek and Beulah Thompson Woodruff. He was baptized in Richland, New York on 31 December 1833 and thereafter was involved in missionary work both in the states and in England. He was called to the Quorum of the Twelve in 1838, served as a Church historian, and was sustained as Church president on 7 April 1889. Woodruff died in San Francisco, California on 2 September 1898.

From the guide to the MS 5506 Wilford Woodruff collection 1830-1898 (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, Church History Library)

Kenney is a Mormon author and historian.

From the guide to the Scott G. Kenney research materials, 1820-1984, (L. Tom Perry Special Collections)

Wilford Woodruff (1807-1898) was one of the most important record keepers in Mormon and early Utah History. His journal, which covers 1833-1898, is the best record for many of Joseph Smith's sermons. Born in Conneticut, Woodruff was in the saw-mill industry when he began a quest to find religion. He soon encountered the Mormon missionaries and was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Within the decade he followed in the footsteps of those missionaries by serving missions in the Southern States, New England, and Great Britain. He was called as an apostle in 1839 and in eight years participated in the vanguard group that entered the Salt Lake Valley on 24 July 1847. He was responsible for helping with Mormon temple work and was the first President of the St. George Temple when it opened. He also supervised a good portion of the construction of the Salt Lake Temple and dedicated it when finished in 1893. He had five wives and thirty-three children. He succeeded John Taylor as LDS Church President in the midst of the Polygamy controversy. With Federal laws fracturing the Church, Woodruff officially ended polygamy in 1890. In the last years of his tenure as President he dealt with the LDS Church's financial difficulties and church-owned businesses being hit by the Panic of 1893. He died in San Francisco in 1898.

From the guide to the Wilford Woodruff papers, 1833-1898, (J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah)

Fourth president of the Mormon Church.

From the description of Record proceeding at the direction of St. George Temple, 1877. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122497436

From the description of Invitation, 1893. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 367407502

From the description of Wilford Woodruff diary excerpt, 1877. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122653038

From the description of Letter, 1887. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122653065

From the description of Letter, 1894. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 82022886

From the description of Ticket, 1893. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122606390

Mormon genealogist, temple recorder, and member of the Utah Militia.

From the guide to the Copies of revelations, 1869-1900, (L. Tom Perry Special Collections)

Abraham Alonzo Kimball was the son of Heber C. and Clarissa Cutler Kimball. He was born April 6, 1846 in Nauvoo, Hancock County, Illinois. He lived with his grandparents in Iowa until 1862, when he came to Utah. He was baptized in 1863 and served two missions. The first mission was to Iowa in 1863,the second to England from 1877-1879. Abraham practiced polygamy. He married Mary Eliza Hatton Kimball in 1866, Lucy Brown in 1874, and Laura Moody in 1882. To these three marriages were born fourteen children, Abraham Kimball, Jr. among them. Abraham kept a series of journals and personal papers which recorded his time as a missionary, as well as his experiences as a Bishop in the Kanosh ward of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Abraham A. Kimball, Sr. died September 24, 1889, of lung complications.

From the guide to the Abraham Alonzo Kimball family papers, 1875-1898, (L. Tom Perry Special Collections)

Wilford Woodruff was an apostle of the Mormon Church and later became president.

From the description of Letters (photocopied), 1887-1889. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122604871

Wilford Woodruff (1807-1898) served as president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1889 to 1898.

Wilford Woodruff was born March 1, 1807. He was raised in Connecticut. Woodruff was a miller by trade. He joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1833 and served two missions before being ordained an Apostle in 1839. As a member of the Quorum of the Twelve, he completed four additional missions, presided over the temple in St. George, Utah, and served six years as Church Historian. He was sustained as Church President on April 7, 1889. As President of the Church, he dedicated temples in Salt Lake City and Manti, Utah, oversaw the organization of the Genealogical Society, and reemphasized the value of historical record keeping. After much pondering and prayer, he received a revelation that the Latter-day Saints should cease the practice of plural marriage. In 1890, he wrote the Manifesto, testifying that the Church had ceased teaching the practice of plural marriage. Woodruss died in San Francisco on September 2, 1898.

From the guide to the Wilford Woodruff diary excerpt, 1877, (L. Tom Perry Special Collections)

Wilford Woodruff (1807-1898) served as president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1889 to 1898.

Wilford Woodruff was born March 1, 1807. He was raised in Connecticut. Woodruff was a miller by trade. He joined The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1833 and served two missions before being ordained an Apostle in 1839. As a member of the Quorum of the Twelve, he completed four additional missions, presided over the temple in St. George, Utah, and served six years as Church Historian. He was sustained as Church President on April 7, 1889. As President of the Church, he dedicated temples in Salt Lake City and Manti, Utah, oversaw the organization of the Genealogical Society, and reemphasized the value of historical record keeping. After much pondering and prayer, he received a revelation that the Latter-day Saints should cease the practice of plural marriage. In 1890, he wrote the Manifesto, testifying that the Church had ceased teaching the practice of plural marriage. Woodruss died in San Francisco on September 2, 1898.

From the guide to the Wilford Woodruff family letters, 1877-1909, (L. Tom Perry Special Collections)

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Subjects:

  • Historiography
  • Reformation
  • Mormons--Diaries
  • Politics and government relations
  • Missions, 1829-1847
  • Mormon Church--Apostles--Diaries
  • Mountain Meadows Massacre, 1857
  • Mormons--Genealogy
  • Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
  • Missions and Missionaries
  • Mormons--Social life and customs
  • Religion
  • Mormons--Utah--Millard County
  • Emigration and immigration
  • Temples
  • Home and Family
  • Plural marriage
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  • Cooperative societies--Utah
  • Private revelations
  • Indian relations
  • Mormon Church--History--Sources
  • Acrostics
  • Vision
  • Revelation
  • Temple work
  • Flags
  • Church government
  • Mormon temples
  • Polygamy--Religious aspects--Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints--History--Sources
  • Mormons--Utah--Manti--History--Sources
  • United order
  • Polygamy--Religious aspects--Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
  • Mormon Church--Presidents--Correspondence
  • Patriarchal blessings (Mormon Church)--History--Source
  • Plural marriage--Underground
  • Mormon church--Apostles
  • End of the world
  • Baptism for the dead
  • Material Types
  • Utah Expedition, 1857-1858
  • Mormons--History--Sources
  • Mormonism (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints)
  • Business enterprises
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  • Pioneers--emigration and immigration
  • Stock certificates--History--Sources
  • Zion's Camp
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  • Social Life and Customs
  • Mines and mineral resources--Utah
  • Materials
  • Freemasons and Mormonism
  • Mormon temples--History--Sources
  • Correspondence
  • Mormon Church--Apostles--Correspondence
  • Education--Utah--History--Sources
  • General Authorities--Speeches, addresses, etc
  • Mormons
  • Mormons--Correspondence
  • Agriculture--Utah
  • Polygamy
  • Mormon Church--Presidents--History--Sources
  • Missionary work
  • Mormon temples--Salt Lake
  • Mormon temples--Manti
  • Mormons--Connecticut--History--Sources

Occupations:

  • General Authorities

Places:

  • St. George (Utah) (as recorded)
  • Salt Lake City (Utah) (as recorded)
  • England (as recorded)
  • Utah (as recorded)
  • St. George (Utah) (as recorded)
  • Washington County (Utah) (as recorded)
  • Bighorn Basin (Mont. and Wyo.) (as recorded)
  • Salt Lake City (Utah) (as recorded)
  • Utah (as recorded)
  • Utah (as recorded)
  • Utah--Saint George (as recorded)
  • Saint George (Utah) (as recorded)
  • Manti (Utah) (as recorded)
  • Ohio (as recorded)
  • Utah (as recorded)
  • Kentucky (as recorded)
  • Connecticut (as recorded)
  • Utah (as recorded)
  • Utah (as recorded)
  • Millard County (Utah) (as recorded)
  • Salt Lake City (Utah) (as recorded)
  • Utah (as recorded)