Florey, Howard, Baron Florey, 1898-1968

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1898-09-24
Death 1968-02-21
English

Biographical notes:

Howard Walter Florey was born on September 24, 1898, in Adelaide, Australia. He received a degree in medicine from Adelaide University in 1921, then went to Oxford as a Rhodes scholar and in 1924, attended Cambridge. He spent 1925 traveling in the United States as a Rockefeller traveling fellow and in 1926, married Mary Ethel Reed, with whom he had two children. The next year, he received his Ph.D. from Cambridge. Between 1927 and 1962, Florey held teaching positions at Cambridge, Sheffield, and Oxford, all in pathology. In 1962, he became provost of Queen's College, Oxford. Florey's most significant contribution, however, was the development of penicillin for practical purposes, as a result of which he shared the Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine in 1945. Though penicillin had been discovered in 1928 by Sir Alexander Fleming, it had gone largely unnoticed for over a decade. In 1939, Florey and Dr. Ernst Boris Chain began experiments with a purified form of penicillin and discovered its ability to combatbacterial infections in humans. Their discovery made penicillin available for use during the last two years of the war. In 1944, Florey was knighted and in 1965, he was made life peer, taking the name Baron Florey of Adelaide. He died on February 21, 1968, in Oxford, England.

From the guide to the Howard Walter Florey papers, 1930-1940, (Manuscripts and Archives)

Howard Walter Florey was born on September 24, 1898, in Adelaide, Australia. He received a degree in medicine from Adelaide University in 1921, then went to Oxford as a Rhodes scholar and in 1924, attended Cambridge. He spent 1925 traveling in the United States as a Rockefeller traveling fellow and in 1926, married Mary Ethel Reed, with whom he had two children. The next year, he received his Ph.D. from Cambridge. Between 1927 and 1962, Florey held teaching positions at Cambridge, Sheffield, and Oxford, all in pathology. In 1962, he became provost of Queen's College, Oxford. Florey's most significant contribution, however, was the development of penicillin for practical purposes, as a result of which he shared the Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine in 1945. Though penicillin had been discovered in 1928 by Sir Alexander Fleming, it had gone largely unnoticed for over a decade. In 1939, Florey and Dr. Ernst Boris Chain began experiments with a purified form of penicillin and discovered its ability to combat bacterial infections in humans. Their discovery made penicillin available for use during the last two years of the war. In 1944, Florey was knighted and in 1965, he was made life peer, taking the name Baron Florey of Adelaide. He died on February 21, 1968, in Oxford, England.

From the description of Howard Walter Florey papers, 1930-1940 (inclusive). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 702168944

Epithet: Baron Florey

British Library Archives and Manuscripts Catalogue : Person : Description : ark:/81055/vdc_100000000837.0x00007b

Howard Walter, Baron Florey O.M.,F.R.S.,M.A.

born Adelaide 24 Sept.1898, died 21 Feb.1968. Professor of Pathology. Demonstrated effectiveness of penicillin in the treatment of human bacterial infection. Awarded Nobel Prize for Medicine, 1945. President of Royal Society, 1960-1965.

From the description of [Reprints of scientific papers] / Howard Florey. 1925-1969. (Libraries Australia). WorldCat record id: 223650186

Loading...

Loading Relationships

Information

Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w64x59cx
Ark ID:
w64x59cx
SNAC ID:
52956253

Subjects:

  • Antibiotics
  • Penicillin--History--Sources
  • Medicine

Occupations:

not available for this record

Places:

not available for this record