Moore, Marianne, 1887-1972

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1887-11-15
Death 1972-02-05
Americans
English, German, French

Biographical notes:

Poet, acting editor of The Dial magazine, 1925-1929. Born Marianne Craig Moore.

From the description of Book manuscripts, 1935-1967. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122417395

From the description of Albums, [ca. 1905-1936]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122524976

From the description of Family correspondence, 1848-1972, bulk 1905-1972. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122540617

From the description of Datebooks, 1920-1970. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122625803

From the description of Photographs, 1887-1972. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 86165756

From the description of Art work. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122585877

From the description of Poems, 1895-1972. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 145506897

From the description of Address books, [ca. 1886-1969]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 145506899

From the description of Financial records, 1892-1969. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 145506900

From the description of Prose, interviews, and lectures, [ca. 1916]-1968. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122633461

From the description of Translations, 1945-1963. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122525007

From the description of General correspondence, 1901-1972. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122524782

From the description of Papers, 1848-1972, bulk 1905-1972. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122580815

Marianne Moore was an American poet.

From the description of Miscellaneous manuscripts, 1953-1957. (University of Pennsylvania Library). WorldCat record id: 191061447

Manager of Marketing Research at Ford Motor Company.

From the description of Autograph card signed : Brooklyn, N.Y., to David Wallace, 1960 Jan. 8. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694852300

Poet Marianne Moore was a friend of art critic Dorothy Adlow.

From the description of Letters, 1953-1954 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 232007815

Poet, editor of The Dial magazine, 1925-1929. Born Marianne Craig Moore.

From the description of Notebooks, 1895-1969. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122591401

Marianne Moore was an American author, noted for her widely respected poetry. Raised in Pennsylvania, she graduated from Bryn Mawr and began writing poetry in earnest. She moved to New York, where she lived the rest of her life, and became editor of The Dial from 1925 through 1929. She is remembered as one of the finest poets of the 20th century, and won the Pulitzer Prize, Bollingen Prize, and the National Book Award for her 1952 book, Collected Poems. She also published prose on a variety of subjects.

From the description of Marianne Moore letters and other material, 1952-1972. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 57358485

American poet.

From the description of Papers of Marianne Moore, 1928-1965. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 30793493

From the description of Letter from Marianne Moore in Brooklyn, N.Y., to Miss Richardson, 1951 Apr. 16. (University of California, San Diego). WorldCat record id: 32605263

From the description of Typed letters signed (2) : Brooklyn, N.Y., to Francis S. Mason, Jr., 1954 May 25 and July 8. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270874980

Marianne Craig Moore was a poet, and editor of THE DIAL, 1924-1929.

From the description of Marianne Moore papers, 1924-1965. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 51576561

From the description of Letters, 1924-1965. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 155519525

American poet Marianne Moore was born in St. Louis, and graduated from Bryn Mawr College in 1909. She lived mostly in New York City, working first as a librarian and later, from 1925 until 1929, as editor of the literary and cultural journal THE DIAL. Her poetry is witty, intellectual, and often satirical. Volumes of her verse include POEMS (1921), OBSERVATIONS (1924), WHAT ARE YEARS? (1941), COLLECTED POEMS (1951, Pulitzer Prize), O TO BE A DRAGON (1959), and COMPLETE POEMS (1967). Among her other works are a translation of THE FABLES OF LA FONTAINE (1954). She attended boxing matches, baseball games, and other public events, dressed in what became her signature garb, a tricorn hat and a black cape. Not long after throwing the first pitch for the 1968 season in Yankee Stadium, Moore suffered the first of a series of strokes. She died in 1972.

From the description of Marianne Moore collection, 1935-1969. (Peking University Library). WorldCat record id: 74215608

Marianne Craige Moore, American Poet, was born November 15, 1887 in Missouri and died February 5, 1972 in Brooklyn, NY. Miss Moore graduated from Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania in 1909. She taught school at the United States Indian School in Carlisle, Pa., was a secretary to a girls school, 1921-1925 was an assistant librarian at the Hudson Park Branch of the New York Public Library, and from 1926-1929 edited the literary magazine "The Dial". Miss Moore was the recipient of many awards including the Bollingen Prize in Poetry, the National Book Award for Poetry and the Pulitzer Prize. She was also known as a fiery rooster for the Brooklyn Dodgers baseball team earning the title poet laureate of baseball.

From the description of Marianne Moore collection. (St. Lawrence University). WorldCat record id: 40636522

Marianne Craig Moore, 1887-1972, poet, attended the Metzger Institute in Carlisle, Pa and Bryn Mawr. She taught at the Carlisle Indian school, 1911 - 1915. Her published works include Poems (1921), Observations (1924), The Pangolin and Other Verse (1936), A Marianne Moore Reader (1961) and The Complete Poems of Marianne Moore (1967).

From the description of Collection, 1913-1983, bulk dates 1940-1965. (Dickinson College). WorldCat record id: 20461484

Marianne Moore, a poet, critic, and translator, was born Marianne Craig Moore in Kirkland, Missouri, the daughter of John Milton Moore, a construction engineer and inventor, and Mary Warner. Moore had an older brother, John Warner Moore. She never met her father; before her birth his invention of a smokeless furnace failed, and he had a nervous and mental breakdown and was hospitalized in Massachusetts. Moore's mother became a housekeeper for John Riddle Warner, her father, an affectionate, well-read Presbyterian pastor in Kirkwood, until his death in 1894. Moore's mother, always overly protective, moved with her children briefly to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and then to Carlisle, Pennsylvania, where Moore attended the Metzger Institute (now part of Dickinson College) through high school. In 1905 she entered Bryn Mawr College, in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania; published nine poems, including "A Jelly-Fish," in its literary magazines Tipyn O'Bob and the Lantern; and majored in history, law, and politics, graduating with a B.A. in 1909. Much--perhaps too much--has been made of Moore's later casual assertion that laboratory studies in biology and histology caused her to consider studying medicine; at any rate, one result of such work was her love of intricately shaped animals and also a lifelong respect for precision in description. She also expressed a desire to become a painter. After taking secretarial courses at Carlisle Commercial College (1910-1911), she taught bookkeeping, stenography, and typing and commercial English and law at the U.S. Industrial Indian School at Carlisle with admirable success until 1915. One of her students was Jim Thorpe, the famous Native American athlete.Moore has proved to be an engaging puzzle, not only to critics of her time but to later ones as well. It is seen that her themes broadened to a degree as she matured. In early works she emphasized a need for discipline and heroic behavior. Later she stressed the need for spiritual grace and love. To survive, she hinted, one must be alert, disciplined, and careful. Gradually she moved from scrutinizing one object to comparing several objects. She delighted in whimsically describing characteristics of animals and athletes, seeing both organisms as subjects and exemplars of art. Never dogmatic in propounding her morality, she often distanced herself and remained furtive by attributing declarative dicta to others and by commenting on quotations and even photographs expressing the point of view of others. For these reasons, critics have not yet reached a consensus--is she modern or anachronistic, imagistic or objectivistic? Regardless, Moore tremendously relished her quietly intense, largely bookish, often convivial life, made memorable to a host of friends by her rapid-fire talk. She was superb at her chosen craft. Her expression is notable for deftness and sharpness of detail, linguistic experimentation, and integration of fresh observation and obscure reading. She teases the reader into looking at reality with keener vision, as though, like her, seemingly for the very first time; challenges the reader to accept the relationship of big and little, animate and inanimate, ideal and object; and invites the reader to note, and practice, the power of words. To those who complained that her poetry often seemed obscure, she once replied that something that was work to write ought to be work to read. Her life displayed and her writings expressed the virtues of courage, loyalty, patience, modesty, spontaneity, and steadfastness. American National Biography Online. (http://www.anb.org/articles/16/16-01159.html?a=1&f=moore,%20marianne&ia=-at&ib=-bib&d=10&ss=0&q=1) Retrieved 6/11/2009.

From the description of Marianne Moore collection, 1963. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 401295093

American poet, critic and translator.

From the description of Typed letter signed : Brooklyn, N.Y., to Robert B. Young, 1955 Oct. 27. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694762290

From the description of Typed letter signed : Brooklyn, N.Y., to David Wallace, 1958 Feb. 7. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694866320

From the description of Typed letter signed : Brooklyn, N.Y., to David Wallace, 1957 Dec. 31. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694863770

From the description of Typed letter signed with initials : Brooklyn, N.Y., to Robert B. Young, 1955 Dec. 6. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694787240

From the description of Typed card signed : Brooklyn, N.Y., to David Wallace, 1962 Apr. 28. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694873451

From the description of Typed letter signed : Brooklyn, N.Y., to Robert B. Young, 1955 Oct. 21. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694738977

From the description of Typed letter signed : Brooklyn, N.Y., to Robert B. Young, 1955 Nov. 13. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694772457

From the description of Typed letter signed : Brooklyn, N.Y., to Robert B. Young, 1955 Nov. 7. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694769519

From the description of Typed letter signed : Brooklyn, N.Y., to Robert B. Young, 1955 Nov. 19. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694772462

From the description of Autograph postal card signed : Brooklyn, N.Y., to David Wallace, 1960 Nov. 15. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694866474

From the description of Typed letter signed : Brooklyn, N.Y., to David Wallace, 1957 Dec. 19. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694856167

From the description of Autograph postal card signed : place not specified, to David Wallace, 1962 Nov. 20. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694866545

From the description of Typed letter signed : Brooklyn, N.Y., to David Wallace, 1957 Dec. 17. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694852150

From the description of Typed letter signed : Brooklyn, N.Y., to David Wallace, 1958 Jan. 5. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694856210

From the description of Typed letter signed : Brooklyn, N.Y., to Robert B. Young, 1955 Dec. 8. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694772583

From the description of Typed letter signed with initials : Brooklyn, N.Y., to Robert B. Young, 1955 Nov. 28. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694772512

From the description of Typed letter signed : Brooklyn, N.Y., to David Wallace, 1956 Nov. 11. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 694794304

American author.

From the description of Correspondence, 1957-1968. (Ohio State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 23263028

Marianne Moore, poet and editor of The Dial (1925-1929), was a long-time friend of Monroe Wheeler and Glenway Wescott, whom she met in the early 1920s while living in New York City.

From the guide to the Glenway Wescott and Monroe Wheeler collection of Marianne Moore, 1923-1972, (Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library)

Marianne Moore was an American poet, playwright, literary critic, essayist, translator, and childrens' book author.

From the guide to the Marianne Moore collection of papers, 1887-1975, 1921-1969, (The New York Public Library. Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature.)

Poet Marianne Moore was born November 15, 1887, near St. Louis, Missouri and grew up in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. She graduated from Bryn Mawr College in 1909 with a B.A. in Biology. She went on to study and later teach at Carlisle Commercial College. In 1918 Moore and her mother moved to New York City, and in 1921 Moore became an assistant in the New York Public Library. Moore began to meet with other poets such as William Carlos Williams and Wallace Stevens, and to contribute to the Dial, a prestigious literary magazine. She was acting editor of the Dial from 1925 to 1929. Her first book, Poems, was published in 1921 without her knowledge by a friend, H.D. Moore went on to publish other books, including Observations (1924), What Are Years? (1941), Collected Poems (1951; Pulitzer Prize), O to Be a Dragon (1959), and Complete Poems (1967). Moore was widely recognized for her work and honored with the Bollingen Prize, the National Book Award, and the Pulitzer Prize.

Jack W.C. Hagstrom was born December 2, 1933 in Rockford, Illinois. After receiving his undergraduate education at Amherst, Hagstrom attended Cornell University Medical College, from which he received a master's degree in 1959. Hagstrom remained at Cornell after graduation and eventually became Instructor of Pathology at Cornell University Medical College. He retained ties with Amherst College after graduation. His avocation of book and poetry collecting developed into a close and ongoing relationship with the Amherst College Library. Hagstrom is a collector of poetry by Robert Frost, whom Hagstrom met at Amherst College as a student. Hagstrom collected over 250 volumes of Frost's work and helped secure tape recordings of Frost's lectures for permanent placement in the Amherst College library. Hagstrom's interest in poetry also led him to develop a friendship with another poet, Marianne Moore. Their correspondence comprises the contents of this collection.

From the guide to the Correspondence with Jack W. C. Hagstrom, 1958-1966, (Amherst College Archives and Special Collections)

Marianne Moore, poet and editor of The Dial.

Glenway Wescott, 1901-1987, novelist.

Monroe Wheeler, 1899-1988, publisher and director of exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art.

From the description of Glenway Wescott and Monroe Wheeler collection of Marianne Moore, 1923-1972. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 83865173

Marianne Moore, poet and editor of The Dial.

Glenway Wescott, 1901-1987, novelist.

Monroe Wheeler, 1899-1988, publisher and director of exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art.

From the description of Glenway Wescott and Monroe Wheeler collection of Marianne Moore, 1923-1972. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 702163996

American poet, born St. Louis, Missouri. Moore graduated from Bryn Mawr College and from 1911 to 1915 taught at the Carlisle (Pennsylvania) Indian School. She moved to New York City in 1918 and worked at the New York Public Library while meeting other poets and contributing to The Dial. She was acting editor of The Dial from 1925 to 1929. Her work was also published in the English magazine The Egoist along with that of other members of the Imagist movement. English poet H.D. (Hilda Doolittle) published Moore's first book of poems without her knowledge in 1921.

She went on to publish substantially in prose and verse; the Complete poems appeared in 1967. Moore was recipient of the Bollingen Prize, the National Book Award, and the Pulitzer Prize.

From the description of Humility, concentration and gusto : and related material, 1949. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122530282

Marianne Craig Moore was an award-winning modernist poet, writer, and critic known for her precise use of words, unusual style, and speech-like poetic rhythm. Marianne was born in Kirkwood, Missouri on November 15, 1887 to Mary Warner Moore and John Milton Moore. Because Moore’s father suffered a mental breakdown prior to her birth, Marianne never knew him. She grew up in the house of her grandfather, John R. Warner, a Presbyterian minister.

After the death of Reverend Moore in 1894, Mary moved Marianne and her older brother, John, to Allegheny City, Pennsylvania and then to Carlisle, Pennsylvania to be closer to other relatives. Mary, John, and Marianne were extremely close and filled much of their spare time with reading. Mary taught English at the Metzger Institute in Carlisle, where Marianne received her initial education. A single mother, Mary worked so that John could attend college at Yale and Marianne could go to Bryn Mawr.

In 1904 and 1905, Marianne took entrance examinations in preparation for attending Bryn Mawr. She moved into her dormitory in the fall of 1905. Although she had wanted to be an English major, her professors refused to let her, saying that her writing was too obscure and that she consistently violated rules of grammar and language-two qualities that would be hallmarks of her modernist poetry. Despite her disappointment, Marianne continued to read avidly and wrote during her college years. She published short stories and poetry in Bryn Mawr’s Tipyn o’Bob and Lantern. Marianne also had a keen interest in biology but was discouraged from majoring in the subject since her mother thought that biology was no profession for a lady. Animals and nature, however, were never far from her mind or her poetry. In the end, Marianne graduated in the Class of 1909 with a B.A. in history, economics, and politics.

After graduation, Marianne and her mother took a trip abroad. Her experiences overseas perceptibly influenced her poetry. Upon returning to the United States, Marianne attempted to have her poetry published. At the same time, she sought a job working for publishers or magazines. Failing on both fronts, she attended the Carlisle Commercial College to learn secretarial skills to become more qualified for work. Marianne got her first position working for Melvil Dewey as his secretary at the Lake Placid Club. She next worked as a teacher at the United States Indian School in Carlisle. While Marianne was teaching, she managed to find time to write. She was professionally published, at last, in 1915.

Marianne and her mother moved to New York City in 1918. With her mother always at her side, she churned out poetry, read voraciously, and interacted with other modernist poets. In 1920, Marianne was published ever more frequently in The Dial, a modernist magazine. Purchased by Scofield Thayer and J. Sibley Watson, Jr. in 1919, The Dial became a popular outlet for modernist thought, literature, and art. The art of Pablo Picasso, Renoir, Vincent Van Gogh, and Edvard Munch, among others, and the poetry of E.E. Cummings, William Carlos Williams, Ezra Pound, and W.B. Yeats, among others, were often featured in the magazine. In 1925, Thayer finally got Moore to agree to become acting editor of The Dial. Soon, she permanently replaced him. Moore was editor until 1929 when the magazine ceased publication. Until her death, Marianne would maintain a close friendship with J. Sibley Watson, Jr. and his wife Hildegarde.

During the 1930s and 1940s, Marianne was an active freelance writer and published books of her poetry. In 1947 she was devastated by the loss of her mother. The 1950s and 1960s brought Moore more fame and recognition. Her Collected Poems, published in 1951, won her the Bollingen Prize, the Pulitzer Prize, and the National Book Award. She was also the recipient of The National Medal for Literature, France’s Croix de Chevalier, and sixteen honorary degrees. Until the onset of her final illness in 1969, Moore traveled, participated in numerous speaking engagements, and graciously offered advice to young writers. She died on February 5, 1972. In addition to being remembered as a groundbreaking poet, Marianne Moore is remembered for her captivating conversations, iconic tricorn cap, advocacy for the conservation of Prospect Park, and love for baseball and Brooklyn.

Bibliography Willis, Patricia C. 1987. Marianne Moore: Vision into Verse. Philadelphia: Rosenbach Museum and Library.

From the guide to the Marianne Craig Moore papers, Bulk, 1905-1972, 1904-1991, (Bryn Mawr College)

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Subjects:

  • Children
  • Watson, James S. (James Sibley), 1894-1982
  • World War, 1939-1945--Poetry
  • Bryn Mawr College--Alumni and alumnae
  • Refugees
  • Layout (Printing)
  • Poetry
  • Women poets, American--20th century--Biography
  • Watson, Hildegarde Lasell
  • Women's education
  • Literature--Miscellanea
  • Women poets, American--Correspondence
  • World War, 1939-1945--Children
  • National Book Awards
  • Biology--Miscellanea
  • Poetry--A magazine of verse
  • Religion--Miscellanea
  • Authors, American--Correspondence
  • World War, 1939-1945--Refugees
  • Poets, American--20th century--Correspondence
  • Poets, American--Correspondence
  • Women poets, American--20th century--Correspondence
  • Manuscripts, American--Specimens
  • Poets, American--20th century
  • Charities
  • Health--Miscellanea
  • Dial (Chicago)
  • Bookbinding
  • Moore, Marianne, 1887-1972. Poems
  • Printers--Correspondence
  • Women poets, American
  • Poets, American
  • World War, 1939-1945
  • Authors, American--20th century--Archives
  • Poets, American--20th century--Archives
  • Poetry, Modern--20th century
  • Baseball--Miscellanea
  • Authors, American--20th century
  • World War, 1939-1945--Civilian relief
  • Social work with children

Occupations:

  • Authors
  • Poets
  • Poets, American--20th century.--New York (State)--New York
  • Artists
  • Critic
  • Editors
  • Women poets
  • Publisher

Places:

  • Europe (as recorded)
  • Europe (as recorded)
  • New York (State)--New York (as recorded)
  • France (as recorded)
  • France (as recorded)