Howe, Julia Ward, 1819-1910

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1819-05-27
Death 1910-10-17
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

Julia Ward Howe was the author of the Battle hymn of the republic and other works and a women's suffrage and club leader and lecturer. In Feb. 1862, the Atlantic Monthly published her poem "Battle Hymn of the Republic," which she wrote during a visit to an army camp near Washington, D.C. in 1861.

From the description of Papers concerning the Battle hymn of the republic, 1897-1906. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 80781526

Julia Ward Howe was the author of the Battle hymn of the Republic and other works and a women's suffrage and club leader and lecturer. In Feb. 1862, the Atlantic Monthly published her poem "Battle hymn of the Republic," which she wrote during a visit to an army camp near Washington, D.C. in 1861.

From the guide to the Papers concerning the Battle Hymn of the Republic, 1897-1906., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

Julia Ward Howe authored the "Battle Hymn of the Republic" and participated in women's suffrage as a club leader and lecturer. In Feb. 1862, the Atlantic Monthly published her poem "Battle Hymn of the Republic," which she wrote in 1861 during a visit to an army camp near Washington, D.C. Her husband Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe was director of the Perkins Institute for the Blind, Boston. Among their daughters were authors Laura Elizabeth Howe Richards and Maud Howe Elliott. Their granddaughter was Rosalind Richards (the donor).

From the guide to the Papers, 1790-1951., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

American poet and suffrage leader.

From the description of Battle hymn of the republic : autograph manuscript copy of the poem, [1861 or later]. (Morgan Library & Museum). WorldCat record id: 78755128

American author and reformer.

From the description of Autograph letter signed : to Prof. Knight, 1901 Apr. 27. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 269537641

From the description of Papers of Julia Ward Howe, 1858-1908. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 30793438

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Boston, to Mrs. Ford, 1873 Nov. 14. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 269523269

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Newport, to Editor, The Independent, 1872 Oct. 16. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 269532565

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Newport, Rhode Island, to Marcus Benjamin, 1887 Aug. 20. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 269532545

Julia Ward Howe authored the "Battle Hymn of the Republic" and participated in women's suffrage as a club leader and lecturer. In Feb. 1862, the Atlantic Monthly published her poem "Battle Hymn of the Republic" which she wrote in 1861 during a visit to an army camp near Washington, D.C. Her husband Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe was director of the Perkins Institute for the Blind, Boston. Among their daughters were authors Laura Elizabeth Howe Richards and Maud Howe Elliott. Their granddaughter was Rosalind Richards (the donor).

From the description of Papers, 1790-1951. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 78006791

Poetess and active in the women's suffrage and prison reform movements.

From the description of Battle hymn of the republic, 1892. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122605110

Author, social reformer and poet. Wrote "Battle hymn of the Republic."

From the description of Letter, 186?. (Boston Athenaeum). WorldCat record id: 41417971

Julia Ward Howe was the author of the "Battle hymn of the Republic" and other works and a women's suffrage and club leader and lecturer. In Feb. 1862, the Atlantic Monthy published her poem "Battle hymn of the Republic," which she wrote during a visit to an army camp near Washington, D.C. in 1861. Her father was successful banker Samuel Ward (1786-1839).

From the guide to the Julia Ward Howe poems, 1831-1834., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

Author of the Battle Hymn of the Republic and other works, women's suffrage and club leader and lecturer, Howe served as president of the Massachusetts and New England Suffrage associations, was one of the founders of The Woman's Journal, and was founder and president of the New England Women's Club and the Association for the Advancement of Women. First woman elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters, Howe in later life was hailed as the "Grand Old Woman of America." For futher information see Notable American Women, 1607-1950 (1971) and the Dictionary of American Biography.

From the description of Papers, 1874-1910 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 232008697

Julia Ward Howe was an American poet, lecturer, and social reformer. Best remembered for writing The Battle Hymn of the Republic, Howe was a popular lecturer, an inspired conversationalist, a leader of the 19th century woman's movement, and an activist in pursuit of humane treatment for all individuals.

From the description of Julia Ward Howe letters, 1852-1910. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 50033133

Author of the Battle Hymn of the Republic and other works, women's suffrage and club leader and lecturer, Howe served as president of the Massachusetts and New England Woman Suffrage associations, was one of the founders of The Woman's Journal and was founder and president of the New England Women's Club and the Association for the Advancement of Women. First woman elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters, Howe in later life was hailed as the "Grand Old Woman of America." For further information see Notable American Women, 1607-1950 (1971) and the Dictionary of American Biography.

From the description of Papers, 1857-1961 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 122298084

Julia Ward Howe was the author of the "Battle hymn of the Republic" and other works and a women's suffrage and club leader and lecturer. Her father was successful banker, Samuel Ward (1786-1839).

From the description of Julia Ward Howe poems, 1831-1834. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 612748209

American abolitionist and poet, most noted as the author of "The Battle Hymn of the Republic."

From the description of [Note] / Julia Ward Howe. 1906. (Smith College). WorldCat record id: 234302638

Author and reformer.

From the description of Julia Ward Howe papers, 1845-1917. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70980123

Howe was an American writer and active in the women's suffrage movement.

From the description of ALS, 1909 December 19, Boston (Mass.) to Mr. Johnson. (Haverford College Library). WorldCat record id: 42056970

American author; writer of The Battle Hymn of the Republic.

From the description of Julia Ward Howe letter, 1900, to Mrs. J. A. Gravett. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 754867639

Julia Ward Howe (1819-1910) was a prominent social activist and poet best known for penning The Battle Hymn of the Republic. Howe was born in New York City to Samuel Ward, Jr., a stockbroker, and Julia Rush, a poet who died of tuberculosis when Julia was just five years old. Howe was educated at schools for young ladies and by tutors at home until the age of sixteen. Her father died in 1839. Julia married Samuel Gridley Howe, head of the Perkins Institute for the Blind, in 1843. The couple had six children, the last of which was born in 1859. In South Boston Julia cared for her household and children while her husband participated in prison reform, school reform and abolitionist activities. Unhappy in her new surroundings and prohibited by her husband from participating in public reform work, she attended lectures, privately studied foreign languages, religion, and philosophy, and wrote poetry and drama. Her husband's resistance to her growing public life and reputation led to difficulties in their marriage, and Julia contemplated divorce more than once during the 1850s. Howe's most famous work, The Battle Hymn of the Republic, was published in the Atlantic Monthly in February 1862. She wrote the poem in 1861 while in Washington, DC with her husband, who was helping distribute supplies to Massachusetts regiments. Set to the music of John Brown's Body, her poem became the rallying song for the North during the final year of the Civil War. By 1868, when Howe's husband no longer opposed her involvement in public life, she seized the opportunity to become active in reform after years of relative isolation. Founder and president of the New England Woman Suffrage Association, she became co-leader, with Lucy Stone, of the American Woman Suffrage Association in 1869. In January 1876, when her husband died, Howe's public involvement expanded rapidly. Throughout the 1880s and 1890s (and until her death in 1910 at the age of ninety-one), she founded and presided over numerous organizations dedicated to improving opportunities for women in education, politics, and the professions. She also went on speaking tours not only in the United States, but in Europe and the Middle East as well.

From the description of Julia Ward Howe papers, 1891-1898. (University of North Carolina at Greensboro, University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 429909574

Julia Ward Howe authored the "Battle Hymn of the Republic" and participated in women's suffrage as a club leader and lecturer. In Feb. 1862, the Atlantic Monthly published her poem "Battle Hymn of the Republic," which she wrote in 1861 during a visit to an army camp near Washington, D.C. Her husband Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe was director of the Perkins Institute for the Blind, Boston.

From the description of Julia Ward Howe proofs and miscellany, 1854-1889 and undated. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 612828223

From the guide to the Julia Ward Howe proofs and miscellany, 1854-1889 and undated., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

Julia Ward Howe (1819-1910) was an American poet and social reformer.

Joseph Pulitzer (1847-1911) was a Hungarian American newspaper publisher.

From the description of Julia Ward Howe letter to Joseph Pulitzer, 1906 September 12. (Brigham Young University). WorldCat record id: 80758661

Biographical Note

  • 1819, May 27: Born, New York, N. Y.
  • 1843: Married Samuel Gridley Howe (died 1876)
  • 1843 - 1844 : Toured Europe with her husband
  • 1852 - 1853 : Wrote articles for the Free Soil journal, The Commonwealth
  • 1854: Published anonymously Passion-Flowers. Boston: Ticknor, Reed, and Fields
  • 1857: Published The World's Own. Boston: Ticknor and Fields Published Words for the Hour. Boston: Ticknor and Fields
  • 1859: Visited Cuba
  • 1860: Published A Trip to Cuba. Boston: Ticknor and Fields
  • 1861: Wrote "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" to the rhythm of "John Brown's Body;" published in Atlantic Monthly, Feb. 1862
  • 1864: Edited The Boatswain's Whistle in Boston
  • 1866: Published Later Lyrics. Boston: J. E. Tilton
  • 1867: Toured Europe
  • 1868: Published From the Oak to the Olive. Boston: Lee & Shepard Elected president of the New England Woman Suffrage Association
  • 1869: Delivered suffrage addresses to a committee of the Massachusetts legislature and to the American Woman Suffrage Association convention in Cleveland, Ohio
  • 1870: Wrote "An Appeal to Womanhood Throughout the World" to promote peace Delivered her first sermon from a pulpit, Harrisburg, Pa. Elected president of New England Woman's Club
  • 1871: Chosen president, American Branch of the Woman's International Peace Association
  • 1872 - 1879 : Edited with others The Woman's Journal
  • 1873: Organized the Woman's Liberal Christian Union, Boston, Mass., for women preachers Joined the Association for the Advancement of Women
  • 1874: Published Sex and Education. Boston: Roberts Brothers
  • 1876: Published Memoir of Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe. Boston: Printed by A. J. Wright
  • 1877 - 1879 : Toured Europe and the Middle East
  • 1881: Published Modern Society. Boston: Roberts Brothers
  • 1883: Published Margaret Fuller (Marchesa Ossoli). Boston: Roberts Brothers.
  • 1884 - 1885 : President, Department of Woman's Work of the World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition in New Orleans, La.
  • 1888: Lectured across the American West
  • 1891: Proposed that citizenship tests be given for new immigrant voters, Association for the Advancement of Women convention, Grand Rapids, Mich.
  • 1895: Published Is Polite Society Polite? Boston: Lamson, Wolffe
  • 1898: Published From Sunset Ridge. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin
  • 1899: Published Reminiscences, 1819-1899. Boston: Houghton, Mifflin
  • 1907: First woman elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters
  • 1910, Oct. 17: Died, Newport, R. I.

From the guide to the Julia Ward Howe Papers, 1845-1917, (Manuscript Division Library of Congress)

Biographical/Historical Note

American author; writer of The Battle Hymn of the Republic.

From the guide to the Julia Ward Howe letter to Mrs. J. A. Gravett, 1900, (Hoover Institution Archives)

Julia Ward Howe (1819-1910) was an American poet and social reformer.

Julia Ward Howe was born on May 27, 1819 in New York City, the daughter of a prominent banker. She married social reformer Samuel Gridley Howe in 1843. She was a poet, and is best known for writing the words to "The Battle Hymn of the Republic." She was also a social reformer, and was particularly interested in abolition, pacifism, and women's suffrage. Together with her husband she edited the Boston Commonwealth, an anti-slavery newspaper. Howe died on October 17, 1910 in Portsmouth, Rhode Island.

Joseph Pulitzer (1847-1911) was a Hungarian American newspaper publisher.

Joseph Pulitzer was born Politzer József on April 10, 1847 in Makó, Hungary. He emigrated to the United States in 1864, and served in the cavalry during the Civil War. In 1868 he took a job as a reporter for the Westliche Post in St. Louis, Missouri, and soon was elected to the state legislature. He then moved into newspaper publishing, purchasing the St. Louis Dispatch and the St. Louis Post in 1879 and merging the papers to form the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. In 1883 he purchased the New York World newspaper, where he engaged in yellow journalism publishing in a circulation war with William Randolph Hearst. Pulitzer died on October 29, 1911 on his yacht in Charleston Harbor, Charleston, South Carolina.

From the guide to the Julia Ward Howe letter to Joseph Pulitzer, 1906 September 12, (L. Tom Perry Special Collections)

Loading...

Loading Relationships

Information

Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w64b3354
Ark ID:
w64b3354
SNAC ID:
30680353

Subjects:

  • Exhibitions
  • Women authors, American
  • Publishers and publishing--19th century
  • Women--Suffrage
  • Women--Suffrage--19th century
  • Poets, American
  • Peace
  • Women--Societies and clubs
  • Prisons
  • Poetry
  • Drama (American)
  • Patriotic music
  • Suffrage
  • Music
  • American literature--19th century
  • Women's rights
  • American poetry--19th century
  • National songs--Texts
  • National songs
  • Women--Education
  • Women poets, American--Biography
  • Philosophy
  • Women authors, American--Biography
  • Religion
  • African American women
  • Social reformers
  • American literature--Women authors
  • Women--Societies and clubs--History--19th century
  • Poets, English
  • Women
  • Social action
  • Education
  • Social reformers--United States
  • Manuscripts, American
  • Exhibitions--Louisiana--New Orleans
  • Draft Riot, New York, N.Y., 1863
  • Social ethics
  • Prisons--United States
  • Women and peace
  • Women--Employment--19th century
  • Father and child
  • Finance, Personal
  • Material Types
  • Education--United States
  • Correspondence
  • Women authors, American - 19th century--Correspondence
  • Songs
  • Race relations
  • American literature

Occupations:

  • Reformers
  • Women authors, American
  • Authors
  • Lecturers
  • Suffragists
  • Dramatists
  • Women authors
  • Poets

Places:

  • Massachusetts (as recorded)
  • Europe (as recorded)
  • Brittany (France) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Boston (Mass.) (as recorded)
  • Greece (as recorded)
  • Louisiana--New Orleans (as recorded)