Bragg, Braxton, 1817-1876

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1817-03-22
Death 1876-09-27

Biographical notes:

Confederate Army officer, planter, and engineer.

From the description of Braxton Bragg papers, 1833-1879 [microform]. (Rhinelander District Library). WorldCat record id: 44880220

Confederate General.

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Mobile, to H. Storm, 1873 Oct. 9. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270133497

Army officer.

From the description of Braxton Bragg papers, 1861-1863. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 79455179

General Braxton Bragg (1817-1876), Confederate general.

From the description of Scrapbook, 1863. (New York University, Group Batchload). WorldCat record id: 58660330

U.S. Army officer; Louisiana planter; Confederate Army officer; civil engineer in Alabama and Texas following Civil War.

From the description of Braxton Bragg papers, 1852-1864 [manuscript]. (Oceanside Free Library). WorldCat record id: 23044968

General Braxton Bragg (1817-1876) was a colonel in the US Army before resigning in 1856 and then fighting with the Confederate States of America as general during the Civil War. He commanded the Army of Tennessee, fighting in the Battles of Shiloh, Stones River, Chickamauga, and Chattanooga. Bragg served as Albert Sidney Johnston’s Chief of Staff and as military adviser to Jefferson Davis, with whom he fled to Georgia after Lee’s surrender. Bragg eventually moved to Galveston, TX, after the end of the war and became a civil engineer for the railroad. In 1849, he married Elise Brooks Ellis (d. 1908).

From the guide to the Braxton Bragg Papers 91-257; 2009-269., 1853-1876, (Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin)

Braxton Bragg of North Carolina graduated from West Point in 1837, served in the Seminole and Mexican Wars, and resigned his commission in 1856 to become a sugar planter in Louisiana. He was a full general in the Confederate army and in September 1863 won the one major Confederate victory in the West, at Chickamauga. He failed to follow up his success and later was routed at Chattanooga. For a time after the war he served as Alabama's chief engineer and then settled in Galveston, Texas, where he died on September 27, 1876.

From the description of Braxton Bragg letter, 1853 Jan. 10. (Louisiana State University). WorldCat record id: 77550123

From the description of Braxton Bragg letter, 1856 Feb. 10. (Louisiana State University). WorldCat record id: 77550124

From the description of Braxton Bragg letter, 1875 Feb. 12. (Louisiana State University). WorldCat record id: 77550127

Braxton Bragg (1817-1876) was born in Warrenton, North Carolina. He entered the United States Military Academy in 1833 and graduated four years later with the rank of Second Lieutenant. Bragg served with distinction during the Mexican War, particularly at Monterey and Buena Vista. In 1849 he married Elise Brooks Ellis, and he resigned his commission in 1856 to farm Bivouac Plantation in Louisiana. In March of 1861 Bragg was commis­sioned Brigadier General in the Confederate army and given command of the Army of Pensacola. He saw no military action for eight months, but earned a reputation during this period as an excellent organizer and a strict disciplinarian. In April 1862, Bragg headed north to support General Joseph E. Johnston's Army of Mississippi. Bragg fought aggressively at Shiloh and was commissioned General after that battle. In June, Bragg took command of the Army of Tennessee, and during the late summer moved north into Kentucky to prevent General Don C. Buell from uniting his forces at Louisville. Bragg captured Mumfordville and had succeeded in blocking Buell's path when he decided to move to Frankfort to establish a Confederate governorship and to encourage Kentuckians to join the campaign. Buell quickly united his forces at Louisville and engaged Bragg at Perryville. Bragg fought to a draw but then retreated into Tennessee, in effect acknowledging the failure of his Kentucky campaign. Two months later Bragg defeated General William S. Rosecrans at Murfreesboro but failed to exploit his victory. Despite apparent public dissatisfaction with Bragg, Confederate President Jefferson Davis kept him in command. With Rosecrans in pursuit, Bragg was forced from Tullahoma and Chattanooga during the summer of 1863. But at Chickamauga on September 19, Bragg attacked Rosecrans and won a notable victory -- although he again failed to follow up his offensive. The Federals regrouped and General Ulysses S. Grant attacked Bragg November 23 at Chattanooga. Bragg was forced to retreat to Dalton, Georgia, and on November 30 he resigned his command. In February 1864 Davis asked Bragg to become his military advisor. Bragg joined Davis in Richmond and served in that capacity until October, when Davis appointed him to command at Wilmington, North Carolina. Bragg pursued this command with little success as the Confederate military position disintegrated on all fronts. After the war Bragg served as a civil and railroad engineer in Alabama and Texas. He died in Galveston, Texas, September 27, 1876.

From the guide to the Braxton Bragg Papers, 1833-1879, (Western Reserve Historical Society)

Braxton Bragg was a Confederate General in command of the Army of Tennessee during the Civil War.

From the description of Braxton Bragg letter, 1860 Dec. 7. (Louisiana State University). WorldCat record id: 86142702

Braxton Bragg, brigadier general, Confederate States of America, was born 22 March 1817, in Warren County, North Carolina, and died 27 September 1876, in Galveston, Texas.

From the description of Braxton Bragg correspondence, 1861-1864. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122576325

Braxton Bragg was a Confederate general who commanded the Department (Dept.) of North Carolina during the United States (U.S.) Civil War.

From the description of Braxton Bragg papers, undated. (US Army, Mil Hist Institute). WorldCat record id: 50010176

Braxton Bragg (1817-1876) was a United States Army officer, Louisiana planter, Confederate Army general, and a civil engineer in Alabama and Texas following the Civil War.

From the guide to the Braxton Bragg Papers, ., 1852-1864, (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Library. Southern Historical Collection.)

Richard Hawes served as the second provisional Governor of the Confederate government of Kentucky. He took over this position from George Johnson, who was killed in battle in April 1862.

From the description of The inaugural address of the provisional governor of Kentucky broadside, 1862. (Kentucky Historical Society). WorldCat record id: 191699434

Confederate general, from Warrenton (Warren County), N.C., and Thibodeaux Parish, La.

From the description of Papers, 1847-1869. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 19276317

From the description of Papers, 1847-1876. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 122417289

Braxton Bragg was a general in the Confederate States of America Army.

From the description of Braxton Bragg Broadside, 29 September 1862. (Filson Historical Society, The). WorldCat record id: 707091078

General Braxton Bragg (1817-1876) was a colonel in the US Army before resigning in 1856 and then fighting with the Confederate States of America as general during the Civil War.

He commanded the Army of Tennessee, fighting in the Battles of Shiloh, Stones River, Chickamauga, and Chattanooga. Bragg served as Albert Sidney Johnston's Chief of Staff and as military adviser to Jefferson Davis, with whom he fled to Georgia after Lee's surrender. Bragg eventually moved to Galveston, TX, after the end of the war and became a civil engineer for the railroad. In 1849, he married Elise Brooks Ellis (d. 1908).

From the description of Bragg, Braxton, papers, 1853-1876. (University of Texas Libraries). WorldCat record id: 459789170

BRAXTON BRAGG, BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

1817 March 22 Born, Warrenton, North Carolina

1833 Cadet, United States Military Academy

1837 Graduated, 2nd Lieutenant, Artillery

1846-47 Mexican War. Brevetted Captain, Battle of Monterey, 1846; Lieutenant Colonel, Battle of Buena Vista, 1847

1849 Married Elise Brooks Ellis, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana

1856 Resigned commission, farmed. Bivouac Plantation, Louisiana

1861 March 7 Commissioned Brigadier General, Confederate States, Army of Pensacola

November 24 Beat off attack on Pensacola harbor defenses

December 13 Commissioned Major General

1862 January In command, Department of Alabama and West Florida, Mobile

February 18 In command, 2nd. Corps Army of Tennessee

April 6-7 Sent to support Army of Mississippi, Battle of Shiloh

April 12 Commissioned General

June 27 In command, Army of Tennessee

September-October Kentucky Campaign

October 8 Battle of Perryville

December 29

31 Battle of Murfreesboro or Stone River

1863 September 19 Battle of Chickamauga

November 24-25 Battles of Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge

November 30 Resigned command, Army of Tennessee

December 3 Turned over command to General Joseph E. Johnston, at Dalton, Georgia

1864 February 4 Assigned to Headquarters in Richmond as Commander-ln-.Chief and later as personal adviser to President Davis

October 15 In command, Wilmington and Cape Fear River Forts

1865 January 13-15 Federals capture Fort Fisher

February 22 Federals capture Wilmington

March 10 Battle of Kinston, North Carolina

May 9 Captured by Union forces, Concord, Georgia; paroled

1865-76 Civil and railroad engineering, Alabama and Texas

1876 September 27 Died, Galveston, Texas

From the guide to the Bragg, Braxton, Papers, 1861, (University of West Florida Libraries)

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Subjects:

  • Chemical agents (Munitions)
  • Chickamauga, Battle of, 1863
  • Fort Pickens (Fla.)--History--1861
  • Richmond (Va.)
  • Florida--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
  • Broadsides--History--19th century
  • Stones River, Battle of, Murfreesboro, Tenn., 1862-1863
  • Governors--Inaugural address
  • Frankfort (Ky.)--History
  • Freedmen
  • Mexican War, 1846-1848
  • Pensacola (Fla.)--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
  • Confederate States of America. Army--Officers
  • Montgomery (Ala.)
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Campaigns
  • Murfreesboro (Tenn.), Battle of, 1862-1863
  • Propaganda, Confederate
  • Lookout Montain, Battle of, 1863
  • Missionary Ridge, Battle of, Tenn., 1863
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Personal narratives, Confederate
  • Plantations
  • Lookout Mountain, Battle of, Tenn., 1863
  • Missionary Ridge (Tenn. and Ga.), Battle of, 1863
  • Chickamauga, Battle of, Ga., 1863
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Women
  • Shiloh, Battle of, Tenn., 1862
  • Hypnotism
  • Fort Barrancas (Fla.)--History--1861
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Sources
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Correspondence
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
  • Bragg, Braxton, 1817-1876
  • Pensacola (Fla.)--History--1861
  • Slaves

Occupations:

  • Generals--Confederate States of America
  • Plantation owners--Family relationships--Louisiana--Lafourche Parish
  • Artillerymen--United States
  • Plantation owners--Louisiana--Lafourche Parish
  • Army officers
  • Soldiers--United States

Places:

  • United States (as recorded)
  • Louisiana (as recorded)
  • Bardstown (Ky.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Tennessee (as recorded)
  • Louisiana--Lafourche Parish (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Kentucky (as recorded)
  • Galveston (Tex.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Louisiana (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Fort Fisher (N.C. : Fort) (as recorded)
  • Thibodaux (La.) (as recorded)
  • Louisiana--Lafourche Parish (as recorded)
  • Bryantsville (Ky.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Bivouac (La.) (as recorded)
  • Kentucky (as recorded)
  • Bivouac (La.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Galveston (Tex.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)