Princeton University

Alternative names
Dates:
Active 1893
Active 1932
American

Biographical notes:

The collection documents the physical expansion of the University from its earliest period through the acquisition of large tracts of land in the 20th century, including the properties around Carnegie Lake and numerous farms. Early records document transactions with such Princeton University notables as Nathaniel Fitz Randolph, John Witherspoon, Walter Minto, John and Richard Stockton, and John Maclean. For the most part, the papers consist of standard legal documents with detailed descriptions of the properties in question. Most have original signatures.

From the description of University land records, 1752-1976, 1752-1860. (Princeton University Library). WorldCat record id: 177676653

Princeton University's Advisory Councils were instituted on a university-wide basis in 1941. Each advisory council is comprised of alumni and other individuals who act in an advisory capacity to the various academic departments through meetings with departmental faculty, administration, and the Alumni Council. While in their original incarnation the Advisory Councils were also responsible for completing a departmental self-study every three to five years, since 1980 that duty has been ceded to special ad hoc committees.

From the description of Advisory Councils records, 1941-1942. (Princeton University Library). WorldCat record id: 84676493

The College of New Jersey was initially chartered in 1746. The first classes were held in Elizabeth, New Jersey, in the parsonage of the president, the Reverend Jonathan Dickinson. Upon his death, the College moved to Newark, New Jersey, and was headed by the Reverend Aaron Burr, Sr. Since 1756, the College has been located in Princeton, New Jersey. For the first fifty years, nearly all College operations took place within Nassau Hall. Fires, fundraising difficulties, low student enrollment, and the Civil War challenged the vitality of the College in the early and middle nineteenth century, but the College grew vigorously under the leadership of President James McCosh, and it was renamed Princeton University in 1896. The Graduate School was established in 1900, although a limited graduate program had existed since the 1870s. Princeton enthusiastically supported the country (living up to its informal motto, “Princeton in the Nation’s Service”) during the First and Second World Wars, offering the expertise of faculty and campus space for training, as well as facilitating the early graduation of students so they could enlist. The post-World War II years brought dramatic changes to Princeton. The size and strength of the University’s facilities and academic programs-especially for the applied sciences and public policy-were increased dramatically. Under President Robert Goheen, Princeton began to admit minority students in greater numbers in the 1960s and admitted women undergraduates in 1969. Today, Princeton is widely regarded as one of the top universities in the world.

From the guide to the Undergraduate Alumni Records, 1748-1920, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

Princeton University mounted an exhibition booth including photographs and information about the school at the Exposition Universelle Internationale de 1900, a world's fair held in Paris, France between April and November 1900.

From the description of Princeton University exhibition materials and certificate from Exposition Universelle Internationale, 1900. (Princeton University Library). WorldCat record id: 692625897

Princeton University, then known as the College of New Jersey at Princeton, mounted an exhibition booth at the World's Columbian Exposition, a world's fair held in Chicago from May to October 1893.

The exhibit included electrical apparatus designed by Dr. Joseph Henry and relating to the history of the telegraph, a tabletop model of the campus, portraits of the college Presidents, books by faculty and alumni, and photographs of the campus.

From the description of Princeton at the World's Columbian Exhibition records, 1893. (Princeton University Library). WorldCat record id: 692625925

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Arts and Culture in Cuba, 1963-2008, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Environment and Ecology in Colombia and Venezuela, 1988-2007, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Gay and Lesbian Issues in Latin America, II, 1991-2008, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Children and Youth in Mexico and Central America, 1984-2008, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Uruguay's Consejo de Estado: official documents, 1972-1980, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Políticas del Partido Demócrata Cristiano de Chile: documentos y publicaciones, 1942-2005, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Human Rights in Mexico and Central America, 1979-2008, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the HIV/AIDS in Latin America, II, 1980-2008, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The Princeton University Library has developed numerous collections of Latin American ephemera that are unique in their depth and scope. Privileging the popular voices of the region, the collections document numerous political and social movements, and a wide variety of key socioeconomic and cultural developments. Some particularly well-documented topics are grassroots organizing, human rights, electoral politics, indigenous issues, women and gender issues, youth, the environment, health, education, and religion. Types of primary materials collected include pamphlets, non-commercially produced and distributed serials, flyers, posters, working papers, government publications, and other non-traditional formats. Most of the documentation in the collections was produced after the mid 1960s by Latin American nongovernmental organizations of all types, interest groups, political parties, research institutes, and government agencies.

The intensive collecting of ephemera was initiated by Barbara Hadley Stein, the University's first Bibliographer for Latin America, Spain and Portugal (1966-1977). She sought to document some of the major political developments of the period, including the rise to power of military dictatorships, coup d'états, the institutionalization of the Cuban Revolution, and the popular responses to those developments. Her successor, Peter T. Johnson (1977-2003), expanded the geographic and thematic scope of the collections and systematized the process of organizing, cataloging, and preserving them. Intensive collecting in this area continues to this date.

Over the years, materials have been grouped and organized by country or region, and by topic or subject area. Once collections are fully organized, they are cataloged and microfilmed. A complete list of collections appears in the Guide to the Princeton University Latin American Microfilm Collection (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1993) and subsequent supplements. Many of the collections' finding aids are available online. Original print materials have been preserved in many cases.

From the guide to the Politics in Mexico, II, 1968-2008, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)

The University Land Records document the physical expansion of the University from its earliest period through the acquisition of large tracts of land in the 20th century, including the properties around Carnegie Lake and numerous farms. Early records document transactions with such Princeton University notables as Nathaniel FitzRandolph, John Witherspoon, Walter Minto, John and Richard Stockton, and John Maclean.

A portion of the papers relate to research conducted by Professor Gerald Breese for his book Princeton University Land, 1752-1984 (1986).

From the guide to the University Land Records, 1752-1981, 1752-1860, (Princeton University. Library. Dept. of Rare Books and Special Collections)



Biographical notes are generated from the bibliographic and archival source records supplied by data contributors.

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Constellation Information

Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w63z1x39
SNAC ID:
40409822

Subjects:

  • Electric apparatus and appliances--Exhibitions
  • Human rights --Nicaragua.
  • Cuban literature.
  • Sex --Political aspects --Latin America.
  • Aids (Disease) --Latin America --Prevention.
  • Exchanges Of Publications
  • Ecology --Colombia.
  • College students
  • Pollution --Colombia.
  • Human rights --Honduras.
  • Children’s rights --El Salvador.
  • Religion
  • Ecosystem management --Colombia.
  • Christian democracy --Chile.
  • Ecosystem management --Venezuela.
  • Smithsonian Institution
  • Natural History
  • Youth --Mexico.
  • Citizen’s associations --Mexico.
  • Aids (Disease) --Patients --Latin America.
  • Uruguay. Consejo de Estado.
  • Mexico --Foreign policy.
  • Universities and colleges--Departments--Evaluation
  • Esperanto --Cuba.
  • Uruguay --Politics and government --1973-1985.
  • Youth --Nicaragua.
  • Sustainable development --Venezuela.
  • Children --Costa Rica.
  • Henry, Joseph, Personality, Etc.
  • Children’s rights --Panama.
  • Children’s rights --Mexico.
  • Gay culture --Latin America.
  • Youth --Panama.
  • Political candidates --Mexico.
  • Children --El Salvador.
  • Environmental protection --Colombia.
  • Natural resources --Colombia.
  • Children --Guatemala.
  • Partido Acción Nacional (Mexico)
  • Human rights --El Salvador.
  • Human rights --Guatemala.
  • Safe sex in Aids prevention --Latin America.
  • Performing arts --Cuba.
  • Lesbians --Latin America.
  • Uruguay --Armed Forces --Political activity.
  • Child welfare --Nicaragua.
  • Child welfare --Panama.
  • Gay men --Latin America.
  • Children’s rights --Guatemala.
  • Political participation --Mexico.
  • Children’s rights --Nicaragua.
  • Aids (Disease) --Government policy --Latin America.
  • Smithsonian Exchange
  • Ecotourism --Venezuela.
  • Environmental education --Colombia.
  • Princeton University
  • Sexual minorities --Latin America.
  • School lands
  • College students -- New Jersey -- Princeton.
  • Ecology --Venezuela.
  • University Of Pennsylvania
  • Ejército Zapatista de Liberación Nacional (Mexico)
  • Youth --Costa Rica.
  • Homosexuality --Latin America.
  • Natural resources --Venezuela.
  • Political campaigns --Mexico.
  • Mexico --Politics and government --20th century.
  • Telegraph--History--Exhibitions
  • Latin American studies
  • Aids (Disease) --Information services --Latin America.
  • Human rights --Costa Rica.
  • Sustainable development --Colombia.
  • Physics--Study and teaching
  • Military training camps
  • Children --Nicaragua.
  • School lands.
  • Science In America
  • Deeds.
  • Children --Panama.
  • Children’s rights --Honduras.
  • Arts --Cuba.
  • Human rights --Mexico.
  • World War, 1914-1918--Princeton University
  • Baccalaureate addresses
  • Human rights --Panama.
  • Partido de la Revolución Democrática (Mexico)
  • Political collectibles --Mexico.
  • Youth --Honduras.
  • President Of United States
  • HIV positive persons --Latin America.
  • Community health services --Latin America.
  • Youth --Guatemala.
  • Local elections --Mexico.
  • Recommendations For Positions
  • Education
  • Coast Survey
  • Children --Honduras.
  • Social movements --Mexico.
  • Civil War
  • Physics teachers
  • Children --Mexico.
  • Aids (Disease) --Latin America.
  • Mexico --Economic policy.
  • Henry, Joseph, Teaching
  • Astronomy
  • Universities and colleges
  • Child welfare --Honduras.
  • Gay rights --Latin America.
  • Cuba --Intellectual life.
  • Yale
  • Civil-military relations --Uruguay.
  • Environmental education --Venezuela.
  • Princeton (College Of New Jersey)
  • Chemistry
  • Environmental protection --Venezuela.
  • Books--Exhibitions
  • Chile --Politics and government --20th century.
  • Chile --Politics and government --Periodicals.
  • Child welfare --Costa Rica.
  • University Of New York
  • Child welfare --Guatemala.
  • Deeds
  • Telegraph
  • Child welfare --Mexico.
  • Child welfare --El Salvador.
  • Children’s rights --Costa Rica.
  • Mexico --Social policy.
  • Arts, Cuban.
  • Elections --Mexico.
  • Political parties --Mexico.
  • Fumigation --Colombia.
  • Popular culture --Cuba.
  • Army
  • Political parties --Chile.
  • Public health --Latin America.
  • Youth --El Salvador.
  • Campaign paraphernalia --Mexico.
  • Electrochemistry

Occupations:

  • Partido Demócrata-Cristiano (Chile)

Places:

  • Deeds (as recorded)
  • New Jersey--Princeton (as recorded)
  • Uruguay (as recorded)
  • Latin America (as recorded)
  • Deeds (as recorded)
  • Mexico (as recorded)
  • United States--Princeton (as recorded)
  • Mexico (as recorded)
  • Venezuela (as recorded)
  • New Jersey--Princeton (as recorded)
  • Latin America (as recorded)
  • Chile (as recorded)
  • New Jersey--Princeton (as recorded)
  • New Jersey--Princeton (as recorded)
  • Cuba (as recorded)
  • Central America (as recorded)