Schnitzler, Arthur, 1862-1931

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1862-05-15
Death 1931-10-21
Austrians
English, German

Biographical notes:

Olga Schnitzler (née Gussmann; 1882-1970) was Arthur's wife; they were married in 1903 and divorced in 1921. Arthur and Olga Schnitzler were good friends of Alma Mahler and Franz Werfel since at least 1921; Alma recounts numerous anecdotes about Schnitzler in her memoir Mein Leben. The Schnitzlers had two children, Lilli and Heinrich. Heinrich Schnitzler (1902-1982) was a director, dramatist, and teacher; he emigrated to the U.S. in 1938. After the Schnitzlers divorced, Alma remained close friends with Olga, who also emigrated to the U.S. during the Nazi era (possibly together with her son Heinrich).

From the description of Correspondence with Alma Mahler and Franz Werfel, 1921-1949. (University of Pennsylvania Library). WorldCat record id: 155864393

Arthur Schnitzler (1862-1931), dramatist, novelist and critic, was one of the principal figures in the Viennese fin de siecle movement. He was born in Vienna to a bourgoisie Jewish household and was the son of Johann Schnitzler. He trained as a doctor initially and was particularly interested in psychology and psychiatry. He began his literary career in the 1890s and became known to a wide audience through his play Leibelei which was produced in 1895, building on the reputation of Anatol which was released in 1893. Many of his works, such as La Ronde (1921) and Leutnant Gustl (1900), provoked controversy. His play Professor Bernhardi could not be shown until 1918, 6 years after completion, due to censoring. After establishing his career as a dramatist, he turned to fiction with great success, publishing works such as Sterben (1895) and Frulein Else (1924).

From the guide to the Schnitzler Presscuttings Archive, 1891-1937, 1891-1937, (University of Exeter)

Arthur Schnitzler was an Austrian playwright and novelist known for his psychological dramas that dissect turn-of-the-century Viennese bourgeois life. In addition to writing, Schnitzler also had a medical degree and practiced medicine for much of his life, with an interest in psychiatry.

From the description of Arthur Schnitzler correspondence, manuscript, and drawings, 1926 -1931. (Pennsylvania State University Libraries). WorldCat record id: 60525729

Schnitzler was born May 15, 1862 in Vienna, Austria; graduated from the Univ. of Vienna in 1885 and became a practicing physician; he was more interested in a literary career, and his poems began to appear in literary journals under the pen name Anatol in 1886; he characterized himself as an Austrian writer of Jewish origin and wrote plays, short fiction, and novels; died in Vienna on Oct. 21, 1931.

From the description of Papers, 1875-1931. (University of California, Los Angeles). WorldCat record id: 40068379

Biography

Schnitzler was born May 15, 1862 in Vienna, Austria; graduated from the University of Vienna in 1885 and became a practicing physician; he was more interested in a literary career, and his poems began to appear in literary journals under the pen name Anatol in 1886; he characterized himself as an Austrian writer of Jewish origin and wrote plays, short fiction, and novels; died in Vienna on October 21, 1931.

From the guide to the Arthur Schnitzler Papers, 1875-1931, (University of California, Los Angeles. Library. Department of Special Collections.)

Arthur Schnitzler (1862-1931), Austrian dramatist, novelist, short story writer and critic, was born in Vienna, the son of Professor Johann Schnitzler, a distinguished Jewish throat specialist. He attended the High School in Vienna, before studying medicine at the University of Vienna, 1879-1885; he opened his own practice in 1893. In his early life Schnitzler developed an interest in psychiatry, and Sigmund Freud became one of his close acquaintances.

At the age of 31 Schnitzler gave up his hospital post and took to writing. Starting in the 1890s he began to write plays which explored the relationship between the sexes through stories of sexual intrigue. His plays Anatol (1893) and Libelei (1895) helped to make him famous in Austria and Germany. His Hands around, or La ronde (1921), created a scandal in German theatre and provoked anti-semitic riots in Berlin. He was cleared at an obscenity trial, but chose to ban any further European performances of the play during his lifetime.

After the collapse of the Habsburg monarchy Schnitzler concentrated on writing fiction. His works include Sterben (1895) and Der weg ins freie ( The road to the opera, 1905), and the short stories Lieutenant Gustl (1900) and Frulein Else (1926). He spent most of his later years in Vienna, concentrating on his writing.

From the guide to the Arthur Schnitzler: Correspondence and Papers, c. 1878-1931, (Cambridge University Library, Department of Manuscripts and University Archives)

Arthur Schnitzler (May 15, 1862 - October 21, 1931), the son of a Jewish physician, took a medical degree and practiced medicine for much of his life, interesting himself particularly in psychiatry. He made his name as a playwright and novelist, known for his psychological dramas that dissect turn-of-the-century Viennese bourgeois life.

His first success was Anatol (1893), a series of seven one-act plays depicting the casual amours of a wealthy young Viennese man. In his play Liebelei (1896) and in his most successful novel, Leutnant Gustl (1901) he depicted the hollowness of the Austrian military code of honor. In the play Professor Bernhardi (1912) and the novel Der Weg ins Freie (1908) he analyzed the position of the Jews in Austria. His works include plays, novels, collections of stories, and several medical tracts.

Source: Encyclopædia Britannica Online Academic Edition. Encyclopædia Britannica Inc., 2012. Web. 28 Dec. 2012.

From the guide to the Arthur Schnitzler Autographs Collection, 1880-1931, 1962, (Leo Baeck Institute Archives)

Arthur Schnitzler (1862-1931), dramatist, novelist and critic, was one of the principal figures in the Viennese fin de siecle movement. He was born in Vienna to a bourgoisie Jewish household and was the son of Johann Schnitzler. He trained as a doctor initially and was particularly interested in psychology and psychiatry. He began his literary career in the 1890s and became known to a wide audience through his play 'Liebelei' which was produced in 1895, building on the reputation of 'Anatol' which was released in 1893.

He married Olga Gussman in 1903 and they had two children, Heinrich, who continued Arthur's press cuttings collection (EUL MS 214), and Lili. Arthur and Olga divorced in 1921.

From the guide to the Postcard collection relating to Arthur and Olga Schnitzler, early 20th century, (Special Collections Archives, University of Exeter (GB0029))

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Subjects:

  • German literature--20th century
  • Authors, Austrian--Archival resources
  • Austrian fiction 20th century
  • Austrian drama 20th century
  • Dramatists--Archival resources
  • Fiction
  • Short stories, Austrian 19th century
  • Austrian fiction 19th century
  • Drama
  • Short stories, Austrian 20th century
  • Jewish authors--Austria--Vienna--Correspondence
  • Man-woman relationships--Drama
  • Play
  • Publishers and Publishing
  • German literature--Austria--20th century
  • Clippings (books, newspapers etc.)
  • Austrian drama 19th century
  • Austrian newspapers
  • Film scripts
  • Theater
  • Novelists, Austrian--20th century--Correspondence
  • Dramatists, Austrian--20th century--Correspondence
  • Novels
  • Authors

Occupations:

  • Dramatists--Austria--Vienna--Archival resources
  • Authors, Austrian--Archival resources

Places:

  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Massachusetts--Williamstown (as recorded)
  • Austria--Vienna (as recorded)