Randolph, John, 1773-1833

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1773-06-02
Death 1833-05-24

Biographical notes:

Randolph served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1799-1813, 1815-1817, 1819-1825, 1827-1829), the U.S. Senate (1825-1827), the Virginia Constitutional Convention (1829-1830), and as Minister to Russia (1830-1831).

From the description of Letter of introduction, 10 July 1813. (Harvard Law School Library). WorldCat record id: 235133950

U. S. Congressman from Virginia.

From the description of Letter [manuscript] : Liverpool, England, to Jacob Harvey, Cork Ireland, 1822 September 30. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647841944

John Marshall, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, wrote from his home in Richmond, Va. to a Virginia colleague, John Randolph of Roanoke, who was serving in Congress at the time. Randolph and William Leigh, judge of the circuit court in Halifax Co., Va., were intimate friends.

From the description of Correspondence, 1822-1831. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 86172336

Diplomat and U.S. senator and representative from Virginia.

From the description of Papers of John Randolph, 1806-1832. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 79455703

U.S. representative from Virginia.

From the description of Letter to Benjamin Watkins Leigh [manuscript], 1813 September 25. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647813081

American statesman and orator.

From the description of Autograph letter signed "J. R. jr." : Richmond, to an unidentified recipient, 1801 May 22. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270616261

John Randolph of Roanoke (1773-1833) was serving in Congress at the time of this letter. Thomas Abthorpe Cooper (1776-1849) was an actor and theatrical manager in New York City.

From the description of Letter : Georgetown, to Thomas A. Cooper, 1812 January 16. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122538922

George Hannah (1780-1870) was a planter, sportsman, and captain of the Charlotte County Dragoons during the War of 1812.

From the description of Letter : George Town, to George Hannah, 1817 March 4. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122624988

Legislator of "Roanoke," Charlotte County, Va.

From the description of Papers of John Randolph [manuscript], 1832 and n.d. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647874554

John Randolph of Roanoke, Va. was a prominent statesman and orator. At the time the letters were written, Randolph has retired to his home in Roanoke. Key was practicing law in Georgetown.

From the description of Correspondence : with Francis Scott Key, 1813 January 2-1813 September 12. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122632518

Nathaniel Macon (1758-1837) served as speaker of the House of Representatives, 1801-07. The North Carolinian opposed the recharter of the U. S. Bank in 1811, voted against protective tariffs, and opposed internal improvements. He lost the House speakership in 1811 to Henry Clay.

From the description of Letter, 1811 November 4, Washington to John St. G. Randolph, "Bizarre," near Farmville [Cumberland County], Virginia. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 86172204

William Leigh was a judge of the circuit court in Halifax County, Virginia. He was an intimate friend of John Randolph and co-executor of his estate.

From the description of Letter, 1826 December 30, [Washington] to William Leigh. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 145406585

From the description of Letter, 1822 June 22, London to William Leigh, Halifax Court House, Virginia. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122700571

John Randolph (of Roanoke) was a Virginia statesman and orator who served in Congress intermittantly from 1799 until his death in 1833. The Papers of Randolph of Roanoke, by William E. Stokes, Jr., and Francis L. Berkeley, Jr., 1950, includes 31 of these letters.

From the description of Letters, 1816, 1819, 1821-1828. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122488004

American statesman.

From the description of Notes, n.d., of John Randolph of Roanoke [manuscript]. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647804782

John St. George Randolph (1792-c. 1865), a deaf-mute, was sent at age 13 to Thomas Braidwood's school for deaf-mutes for treatment. In 1814 he was spurned by a cousin whom he expected to marry. This disappointment distressed him to the extent of becoming a "frantic maniac" and a future in and out of primitive mental institutions in Philadelphia and Baltimore. At 40, St. George went to live with his court-appointed guardian, Wyatt Cardwell, at Charlotte Court House where he remained for the rest of his life. See Jonathan Daniels, "The Randolphs of Virginia" (Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1972) for biographical information on the family.

From the description of Letter, 1806 September 6, Bizarre [Cumberland County] to John St. G. Randolph, Hackney, near London. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122601323

John Randolph of Roanoke, Va. (1773-1833), was a statesman and orator. This letter was written in between terms served in the U.S. Congress.

From the description of Letter : to David Parrish, 1814 July 28. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122640467

John Randolph "of Roanoke" was a brilliant Virginia statesman and orator. His letter is to Dr. Charles Landon Carter, a contemporary who later married a Randolph and is buried in Fredericksburg, Va.

From the description of Letters : Bizarre, to Dr. Charles Landon Carter, Philadelphia, 1798 March 16. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122624970

Virginia statesman and diplomat, of Roanoke, Va.

From the description of Letters, 1793-1832. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 20115339

U.S. senator; American orator.

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Philadelphia, to St. George Tucker, Esq., 1793 Nov. 23. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270616255

Congressional leader from Virginia, spokesman for the "Old Republican" or "Quids" faction of the Democratic-Republican party that wanted to restrict the federal government's roles.

From the description of John Randolph of Roanoke letter to William Rawle [manuscript], 1804 Jan 4. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 648015557

Virginia statesman and diplomat, of Roanoke Island, Va.

From the description of Letters, 1793-1832. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 154270859

Virginia Congressman.

From the description of Letters of John Randolph [manuscript], 1826 and 1831. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647821446

Statesman, orator; best known as John Randolph of Roanoke.

From the description of ALS : "Bizarre", Cumberland County, Va., to Thomas Marsh Forman, 1804 July 19. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122541881

U.S. Congressman from Virginia.

From the description of John Randolph letter to James Barbour and portrait, n.d., of Randolph, 1825 February 19 [manuscript]. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647835814

From the description of Letter : to James Barbour and portrait, n.d., of Randolph, 1825 February 19. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 30793389

From the description of Letter : Liverpool, England, to Jacob Harvey, Cork Ireland, 1822 September 30. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 32136128

From the description of Letter, 1806 November 20. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 122465516

Virginia legislator from Roanoke.

From the description of Letter to Thomas Marsh Forman Bryan [manuscript], 1823 October 11. (University of Virginia). WorldCat record id: 647873857

Randolph was a U.S. Senator from Virginia (1825-1827). -- Cambreleng was a U.S. Representative from New York (1821-1829) and Minister to Russia (1840-1841).

From the description of [Letter, 1827] Mar. 2 [to] C. C. Cambreleng / J. R. of R. (Smith College). WorldCat record id: 320955844

In the mid seventeenth century William Randolph had founded what was to become one of the great extended dynastic families of late colonial Virginia, holders of great estates, wealth, and many slaves. He established on estates of their own his seven sons, including William of "Turkey Island"; Sir John Randolph of "Tazewell Hall"; and Richard of "Curles". His sons and two daughters were allied by marriage to outstanding families of Virginia, and among their line of descendants are Thomas Jefferson, Robert Marshall, and Robert E. Lee. William Randolph was among the founders and first trustees of the College of William and Mary, later sending six sons to study there. Represented in this collection are letters and documents of descendants of William Randolph including Beverly Randolph, Edmund Jenings Randolph, John Randolph of Roanoke, Peyton Randolph, Thomas Mann Randolph, and William B. Randolph.

From the description of Randolph family of Virginia collection 1771-1840. (Peking University Library). WorldCat record id: 156051294

Virginia senator and congressman.

From the description of ALS : Bizarre, near Farmville, Va., to William Duane, 1804 Aug. 27. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 86102606

U.S. Congressman.

From the description of Letter, 1825 April 1, Washington, [D.C.], to Fish and Grinnell and Company, New York. (University of Toledo). WorldCat record id: 13573941

American legislator, known as John Randolph of Roanoke, b. Prince George co., Va. He briefly studied law under his cousin Edmund Randolph. He served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1799-1813, 1815-17, 1819-25, 1827-29), where he became a prominent and feared figure, and in the U.S. Senate (1825-27). After breaking (1805) with President Jefferson on the acquisition of Florida, which he opposed, Randolph lost his leadership in the House. He strongly opposed James Madison and the War of 1812, the second Bank of the United States, the Missouri Compromise, and the tariff measures. From 1820 he was a violent sectionalist. His impassioned denunciations of Henry Clay and John Quincy Adams led (1826) to a duel with Clay. Appointed (1830) by President Jackson minister to Russia, he resigned shortly after his arrival there because of ill health. Following his return he denounced Jackson's proclamation against nullification. An outspoken champion of individual liberty, he staunchly defended the Constitution and states' rights, and his views were influential in the South long after his death. A bizarre figure, Randolph numbered Pocahontas among his forebears. He became more eccentric in his later years and at times suffered from dementia. Chiefly remembered for his epigrammatic wit and caustic tongue, he also possessed a brilliant and scholarly mind and was celebrated as an orator. (Columbia Encyclopedia)

From the description of John Randolph papers, 1791-1819 (Detroit Public Library). WorldCat record id: 609410497

Politician, Charlotte County, Virginia.

From the description of Letter : Bizarre, 1807 September 1. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122653969

Richard Stanford (1767-1816) was a member of the House of Representatives from North Carolina from 1797 to 1816.

From the description of Letter, 1814 December 23, York Buildings to Richard Stanford, Washington. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122538107

John Randolph (1773-1833), of Roanoke, Virginia, was a brilliant statesman and orator. He served in the U.S. Congress over a period of thirty years.

From the description of Letters, 1801-1813. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122654062

U.S. Senator. American orator.

From the description of Autograph letter signed ("J. R. of R.") : Washington, to F.W. Gilmer, Esq., 1823 Feb. 8. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270616258

Statesman.

John Randolph was born on June 2, 1773, in Prince George County, Virginia. Randolph was educated at Princeton, New Jersey, at Columbia in New York, and at William and Mary College in Virginia. He was a Virginia statesman and an early advocate of the States' Rights doctrine. In 1799, he was elected to the United States House of Representatives for more than twenty years. From 1825 to 1827, he served in the United States Senate. He was a firm believer in states' rights.

Like John Calhoun, he opposed the national bank and protective tariffs, although they disagreed on Western expansion and the War of 1812. He disliked slavery but owned more than 5000 acres of land with hundreds of slaves. Randolph maintained that the federal government had no constitutional right to legislate on the institution of slavery. He lived alone on his plantation on the Little Roanoke River in Charlotte county, Virginia. Randolph died in Philadelphia on May 24, 1833.

From the description of Letter, April 27, 1808. (University of Florida). WorldCat record id: 49504911

John St. George Randolph (1792-c.1865), a deaf-mute was sent at age 13 to Thomas Braidwood's school for deaf-mutes for treatment. In 1814 he was spurned by a cousin whom he expected to marry. This disappointment distressed him to the extent of becoming a "frantic maniac" and having a future in and out of primitive mental institutions in Philadelphia and Baltimore. At 40, St. George went to live with his court-appointed guardian, Wyatt Cardwell, at Charlotte Court House where he remained for the rest of his life.

See Jonathan Daniels, The Randolphs of Virginia (Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1972) for biographical information on the family.

From the description of Letter, 1806 July 3, Bizarre [Cumberland County, Virginia to John St. George Randolph], Hackney, near London. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122481365



Biographical notes are generated from the bibliographic and archival source records supplied by data contributors.

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Subjects:

  • Agriculture
  • Plantations
  • Infanticide--History--18th century
  • Education--19th century
  • Speeches, addresses, etc., American--History--19th century
  • Tariff--History--19th century
  • Spelling errors--History--19th century
  • Embargo, 1807-1809
  • Missouri compromise
  • Tobacco--Law and legislation--History--Sources
  • Slavery
  • Opium abuse
  • Race horses--19th century
  • Households
  • Floods
  • Constitutional law
  • Political science
  • Party discipline
  • Governors--History--Sources
  • Conversion
  • Military camps--History--19th century
  • Death--Psychological aspects
  • Trials (Incest)--History--Sources
  • Slave trade
  • States' rights (American politics)
  • Education
  • Irish--Public opinion--19th century
  • Legislators
  • Women--History--19th century
  • Trials (Infanticide)--History--Sources
  • Scandals--History--18th century--Sources
  • Slaveholders
  • Dragon (Horse)
  • African Americans--19th century
  • Yazoo Fraud, 1795
  • Murder
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  • Slaves--19th century
  • Insanity (Law)--History--19th century
  • Horses--Breeding
  • Book collecting
  • American newspapers
  • Burr Conspiracy, 1805-1807
  • Newspaper publishing--History--19th century
  • Napoleonic Wars, 1800-1815
  • Agriculture--History--19th century
  • Entail
  • Legislators--Correspondence
  • Horse trading--History--19th century
  • Theater--19th century
  • Inheritance and succession
  • Depression, Mental
  • Bookplates
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  • Presidents--Election--1808

Occupations:

not available for this record

Places:

  • Louisiana (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Stratford Hall (Va.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Philadelphia (Pa.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Southern States (as recorded)
  • Albemarle County (Va.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Southern States (as recorded)
  • Virginia--Farmville Region (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Mississippi River (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Europe (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • New York (State)--New York (as recorded)
  • New Jersey (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Richmond (Va.) Theater disaster, 1811 (as recorded)
  • Roanoke River (Va. and N.C.) (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Virginia--Cumberland County (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Amelia County (Va.) (as recorded)
  • England (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Washington (D.C.) (as recorded)
  • Management--Virginia (as recorded)
  • Soviet Union (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • England (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Bizarre (Va. : Estate) (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Bizarre (Va. : Estate) (as recorded)