King, William Henry, 1863-1949

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1863-06-03
Death 1949-11-27
English

Biographical notes:

William H. King was born to William R. King and Josephine Henry King on June 3, 1863 in Fillmore, Millard County, Utah. He married Annie A. Lyman on April 17, 1889 in Manti, Utah. At some point, he also had a wife named Vera Srodahl. He was a Senator in Utah. He passed away on November 27, 1949.

From the description of Senator William H. King's visit to the USSR, 1923. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 368057243

William Henry King was born in Fillmore, Utah, on June 3, 1863, to William and Josephine Henry King. He attended the Brigham Young Academy and the University of Deseret. He served a mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to Britain from 1880-1882. He graduated from the University of Michigan with a law degree in 1887. He married Annie Lyman on April 17, 1889. She passed away around 1907. In 1913, he married Vera Sjodahl. William H King passed away on November 27, 1949, in Salt Lake City.

From the description of Letters from William H. King to Claude T. Barnes, 1937-1938. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 368061276

King served in the U.S. Senate from 1917-1941.

From the description of The William Henry King papers. 1891-1952. (University of Utah). WorldCat record id: 71447886

William Henry King (1863-1949) was a lawyer, judge, and politician. He served as a United States senator for the state of Utah.

William Henry King was born June 3, 1863 in Fillmore, Utah. He attended Brigham Young University and the University of Utah. He served as a missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1880-1883 in Great Britain. He then returned home and was elected to various positions in Fillmore and Millard County. He graduated from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor Law Department, was admitted to the bar in 1890, and began practicing law in Utah.

He served as the president of the Territorial Council in 1891, and then became an associate justice of the Utah Supreme Court from 1894-1896. He was then elected to Congress when Utah was admitted as a state and served until 1899. In 1916 he was elected as a senator to the United States Senate and served there until 1941. He then practiced law in Washington, D.C., until 1947 when he returned to Utah. He died November 27, 1949.

From the guide to the William Henry King papers, 1923, (L. Tom Perry Special Collections)

William Henry King (1863-1949) was very active in the government.

William Henry King was born in Fillmore, Utah, on June 3, 1863, to William and Josephine Henry King. He attended the Brigham Young Academy and the University of Deseret. He served a mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to Britain from 1880-1882. He graduated from the University of Michigan with a law degree in 1887. He married Annie Lyman on April 17, 1889. She passed away around 1907. In 1913, he married Vera Sjodahl.

The online Utah History Encyclopedia gives the following information about King’s governmental service. The entry was written by John Sillitoe:

In 1894 President Grover Cleveland appointed King as an associate justice of the Utah Supreme Court. King was one of the earliest supporters of Sagebrush Democracy, and played a leading role in organizing the Democratic party in Utah. He was elected to Congress in 1896 and served one term. He was then elected to fill a vacancy in 1900 and was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1902. In 1905 and 1909, prior to the direct election of United State senators, King was the unsuccessful choice of the Utah Democratic legislative caucus for senator. In 1916, however, King was elected to the U.S. Senate and served four terms until his defeat in 1940. He was also an active Democrat on the national level, serving as a delegate to the party's national conventions on a number of occasions from 1908 to 1932 .

During his service in the Senate, King was a strong advocate of a ‘hands off’ policy on the part of the United States toward Latin America, and was recognized by the government of Haiti in 1936 for his role in terminating U.S. intervention in the affairs of that nation. King, who labeled himself a Constitutional Democrat, was an outspoken opponent of Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal, specifically challenging the President's attempt to ‘pack’ the Supreme Court in 1937, and opposing other aspects of FDR's domestic program as well .

In 1934 he was challenged in the party convention by liberal state senator Herbert B. Maw and attorney Hugh B. Brown. While King emerged victorious, and went on to defeat Republican Don B. Colton in the general election, it was clear that he would continue to be opposed by party liberals. In 1936 King was defeated in his bid to be elected a delegate to the national Democratic party convention, and was targeted for defeat for the Senate when party liberals passed a direct primary law in the 1937 legislature. In 1940 King, who by then had become even more vocal in his opposition to the national Democratic party, was defeated in the Democratic party primary by liberal congressman Abe Murdock. King served briefly as president pro tem. of the Senate after his defeat in 1940 and before a new Congress was seated in January 1941. After leaving the Senate, King continued to practice law in Washington until his retirement and return to Utah in 1947 .

William H King passed away on November 27, 1949, in Salt Lake City.

Information for this biography came from http://www.media.utah.edu/UHE/k/KING,WILLIAM.html.

From the guide to the William Henry King letters to Claude T. Barnes, 1937-1938, (L. Tom Perry Special Collections)

William Henry King (1863-1949) was a lawyer, judge, and politician. He served as a United States senator for the state of Utah.

William Henry King was born June 3, 1863 in Fillmore, Utah. He attended Brigham Young University and the University of Utah. He served as a missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1880-1883 in Great Britain. He then returned home and was elected to various positions in Fillmore and Millard County. He graduated from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor Law Department, was admitted to the bar in 1890, and began practicing law in Utah.

He served as the president of the Territorial Council in 1891, and then became an associate justice of the Utah Supreme Court from 1894-1896. He was then elected to Congress when Utah was admitted as a state and served until 1899. In 1916 he was elected as a senator to the United States Senate and served there until 1941. He then practiced law in Washington, D.C., until 1947 when he returned to Utah. He died November 27, 1949.

David S. King (1917-2009) was a lawyer and politician in Utah. He served in the United States Congress representing Utah.

David Sjodahl King was born on June 20, 1917 to William Henry King and Vera Bergita Sjodahl in Salt Lake City, Utah. He grew up and was educated in Washington, D.C., and Paris, France. He received his Bachelor of Arts from the University of Utah in 1937. After receiving his bachelor’s he served a mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1937 to 1939. After returning from his mission, he then attended Georgetown University where he received a law degree. King married Roaslie Lehner and they are the parents of eight children.

He became a member of the bar association in both Utah and the District of Columbia. He taught commercial law at Stevens Heneger Business College from 1946 to 1958. He served as a representative to the US Congress from 1959 to 1963. He was appointed as the United States Ambassador to Madagascar and Mauritius in 1967 and served until 1969. For the rest of his career King practiced law in Washington, D.C. He also served as an alternate director at the World Bank.

He retired in 1986 and spent more time serving in his church. He served as a mission president in Haiti from 1986 to 1989, the president of the Washington, D.C., Temple from 1990-1993, and beginning in 2005 served as a patriarch for his stake. King passed away in 2009.

From the guide to the William Henry and David S. King papers, circa 1908-1988, 1880-1882, (L. Tom Perry Special Collections)

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Subjects:

  • Mormon Church--Missions
  • Hospitals--Sources
  • Letters
  • Material Types
  • Medical care--Sources
  • Political Campaigns
  • Mormon missionaries--Hawaii
  • Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
  • Missions and Missionaries
  • Religion
  • Transportation--Sources
  • Politics, Government, and Law
  • Mormonism (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints)
  • Mormon missionaries
  • International relations
  • Legislators--Archives

Occupations:

  • Missionaries
  • Politicians

Places:

  • Russia (as recorded)
  • Soviet Union (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Hawaii (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Russia (Federation) (as recorded)
  • Soviet Union (as recorded)
  • Russia (as recorded)