Terrell, Mary Church, 1863-1954

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1863-09-23
Death 1954-07-24
Americans
German, French, English

Biographical notes:

African American educator and civic leader, of Washington, D.C.

From the description of Mary Church Terrell collection additions, ca. 1895-ca. 1970. (Moorland-Spingarn Resource Center). WorldCat record id: 70941322

African American civil rights leader, lecturer, and educator.

From the description of Mary Church Terrell papers, 1851-1962 (bulk 1886-1954). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 71061683

Mary Church Terrell was born in Memphis, Tennessee in 1863. She graduated from Oberlin College in 1884, and subsequently studied abroad. She was one of the founders in 1896 and the first president of the National Association of Colored Women. From 1906-1911 Mary Church Terrell served on the District of Columbia School Board, the first black woman to be selected for that position. During the 1920s and 1930s she was active in the Republican Party.

From the description of Mary Church Terrell papers, 1851-1962 (inclusive), 1886-1954 (bulk) [microform]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122333202

Biographical Note

  • 1863, Sept. 23: Born, Memphis, Tenn.
  • circa 1869: Attended “Model School” for children, Antioch College, Yellow Springs, Ohio
  • 1884: A.B., Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio
  • 1885 - 1887 : Taught at Wilberforce University, Wilberforce, Ohio
  • 1887 - 1888 : Taught at High School for Colored Youth, Washington, D.C.
  • 1888: A.M., Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio
  • 1888 - 1890 : Studied and traveled in France, Germany, Switzerland, and Italy
  • 1890 - 1891 : Resumed teaching, High School for Colored Youth, Washington, D.C.
  • 1891: Married Robert H. Terrell (died 1925)
  • 1895 - 1901 : Appointed to District of Columbia School Board
  • 1896: Organized and became first president of the National Association of Colored Women
  • 1898 - 1920 : Active in woman's suffrage movement
  • 1904: Addressed International Congress of Women, Berlin, Germany
  • 1906 - 1911 : Reappointed to District of Columbia School Board
  • 1909: Charter member, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
  • 1918 - 1919 : Served in War Camp Community Service
  • 1919: Addressed Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, Zurich, Switzerland
  • 1920: Appointed supervisor, Committee for Eastern District Work among Colored Women, Republican National Committee
  • 1929 - 1930 : Campaigned for Ruth Hanna McCormick, Republican candidate for U.S. Senate from Illinois
  • 1932: Served as adviser to the Republican National Committee, Herbert Hoover presidential campaign
  • 1937: Represented American black women at World Fellowship of Faiths, London, England
  • 1940: Published autobiography, A Colored Woman in a White World. Washington, D.C.: Ransdell
  • 1949: Admitted to membership in the American Association of University Women after being rejected by the Washington, D.C., branch Elected chairman, Coordinating Committee for the Enforcement of the D.C. Anti-Discrimination Laws
  • 1954, July 24: Died, Annapolis, Md.

From the guide to the Mary Church Terrell Papers, 1851-1962, (bulk 1886-1954), (Manuscript Division Library of Congress)

  • 1863 September 23: Born in Memphis, Tennessee, the daughter of Robert and Louise Ayers Church.
  • 1884: Received an A.B. degree from Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio.
  • 1885 - 1887 : Teacher at Wilberforce University, Wilberforce, Ohio.
  • 1888: Received an A.M. degree from Oberlin College.
  • 1887 - 1888 : Teacher at M Street High School, Washington, D.C.
  • 1888 - 1890 : Studies in France, Germany, Switzerland, and Italy.
  • 1890 - 1891 : Teacher at M Street High School, Washington, D.C.
  • 1891 October 28: Married Robert H. Terrell (children: Mary and Phyllis)
  • 1895 - 1901 : Appointed to Washington D.C. Board of Education.
  • 1896 - 1901 : First President of the National Association of Colored Women.
  • 1904: Delegate to the International Congress of Women, Berlin, representing the N.A.C.W.
  • 1909: Charter member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
  • 1919: Delegate to the International League for Peace; Zurich, Switzerland, representing the Woman's League for Peace and Freedom.
  • 1940: Published autobiography, A Colored Woman In A White World.
  • 1946: Received Honorary Doctors of Letters degree from Wilberforce University.
  • 1948: Received Honorary Doctors of Humane Letters degree from Howard University, and Oberlin College.
  • 1954 July 24: Died in Washington, D.C.

From the guide to the Mary Church Terrell Collection, 1888-1976, (Moorland-Spingarn Research Center, Howard University)

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Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6222w4f
Ark ID:
w6222w4f
SNAC ID:
22746066

Subjects:

  • Elections--Illinois
  • Presidents--United States--Election--1928
  • Presidents--Election--1928
  • African Americans--Civil rights--History--Sources
  • Constitutional amendments--United States
  • Presidents--Election--1924
  • Race relations
  • Women
  • Presidents--United States--Election--1920
  • African Americans--Education
  • African Americans--Societies, etc
  • Death--1930-1940
  • Equal rights amendments--United States
  • Constitutional amendments
  • Segregation
  • Women's rights--History--Sources
  • Lynching--United States
  • Presidents--Election--1920
  • Progressivism (United States politics)
  • Civil rights
  • Suffrage
  • African American women
  • Lynching
  • Women's rights
  • Childbirth--1930-1940
  • Peonage--United States
  • Elections
  • Presidents--United States--Election--1924
  • African Americans--Civil rights
  • Peonage
  • Women--Societies and clubs
  • Women--Personal narratives--1930-1940
  • African--Americans--Personal narratives--1930-1940
  • Women--Suffrage
  • Segregation--Washington (D.C.)
  • Equal rights amendments

Occupations:

  • Reformers
  • African American college teachers
  • Lecturers
  • College teachers
  • African American civic leaders--Washington (D.C.)
  • Authors
  • Educators
  • Civil rights leaders
  • Civil rights workers
  • Social reformers

Places:

  • Highland Beach, MD, US
  • Memphis, TN, US
  • United States, 00, US