Luscomb, Florence, 1887-

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1887
Death 1985

Biographical notes:

Trade-unionist.

From the description of Oral history interview with Florence Luscomb, 1976. (Wayne State University, Archives of Labor & Urban). WorldCat record id: 32321605

Florence Hope Luscomb, social and political activist, earned an S.B. in architecture (M.I.T., 1909), and worked as an architect until 1917, when she became executive secretary for the Boston Equal Suffrage Association.

From the description of Papers in the Woman's Rights Collection, 1904-1959 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 232008705

Florence Hope Luscomb, social and political activist, was born in Lowell, Mass., on February 6, 1887, the daughter of Otis and and Hannah Skinner (Knox) Luscomb. With an S.B. in architecture (M.I.T., 1909), she worked as an architect until 1917, when she became executive secretary for the Boston Equal Suffrage Association. She held positions in the Massachusetts Civic League and other organizations and agencies until 1933, when she became a full-time social and political activist. In the early 1920s Luscomb began to serve on the boards of civil rights, civil liberties, and other organizations; over the next 50 years these included the NAACP (Boston), the Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts, the American League for Peace and Democracy, and many others. She helped organize and was president of a Boston local of the United Office and Professional Workers of America.

Luscomb ran unsuccessfully for the Boston City Council, U.S. House of Representatives, and governor of Massachusetts. Never a communist, she opposed anti-communist investigations as attempts to curtail dissent and in the 1950s worked to stop them. In 1955 she was investigated as a subversive by government committees in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Luscomb travelled to the Soviet Union in 1935 and illegally to China in 1962 and attended several international peace and women's conferences. In the 1960s she worked against the Vietnam War and in the 1970s frequently spoke to women's groups and conferences. From the 1950s to the mid 1970s, Luscomb lived in cooperative houses, usually with much younger people. She died in Watertown, Mass., in 1985 at 98.

From the description of Papers, 1856-1987 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 232008111

Florence Hope Luscomb, social and political activist, was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, on February 6, 1887, the daughter of Otis and Hannah Skinner (Knox) Luscomb. With an S.B. in architecture (M.I.T., 1909), she worked as an architect until 1917, when she became executive secretary for the Boston Equal Suffrage Association. She held positions in the Massachusetts Civic League and other organizations and agencies until 1933, when she became a full-time social and political activist. In the early 1920s Luscomb began to serve on the boards of civil rights, civil liberties, and other organizations; over the next 50 years these included the NAACP (Boston), the Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts, the American League for Peace and Democracy, and many others. She helped organize and was president of a Boston local of the United Office and Professional Workers of America.

Luscomb ran unsuccessfully for the Boston City Council, U.S. House of Representatives, and governor of Massachusetts. Never a communist, she opposed anti-communist investigations as attempts to curtail dissent and in the 1950s worked to stop them. In 1955 she was investigated as a subversive by government committees in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Luscomb travelled to the Soviet Union in 1935 and illegally to China in 1962 and attended several international peace and women's conferences. In the 1960s she worked against the Vietnam War and in the 1970s frequently spoke to women's groups and conferences. From the 1950s to the mid 1970s, Luscomb lived in cooperative houses, usually with much younger people. She died in Watertown, Massachusetts, in 1985 at 98.

From the description of Additional papers of Florence Luscomb, 1888-1988 (inclusive). (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 552031725

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Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w61c2pfs
Ark ID:
w61c2pfs
SNAC ID:
32381117

Subjects:

  • Women--Suffrage
  • Labor unions--Organizing
  • Women labor union members
  • Peace movements
  • White collar workers--Labor unions
  • Labor
  • Mothers and daughters
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Women--History--20th century
  • Oral History
  • Women and peace
  • Peace--Societies, etc
  • Disarmament
  • Women in the labor movement
  • Women--Political activity
  • Anti-nuclear movement
  • Women--Social conditions
  • Labor movement
  • Civil rights movement
  • Labor unions
  • Archival resources
  • Interviews
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Protest movements
  • Working class
  • Women's rights
  • Professional employees--Labor unions
  • Skilled labor
  • Korean War, 1950-1953--Protest movements
  • Anti-fascist movements
  • Women--Suffrage--Songs and music
  • Women--Employment

Occupations:

  • Social reformers

Places:

  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Massachusetts (as recorded)
  • New York (State) (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • New Hampshire (as recorded)
  • Detroit (Mich.) (as recorded)
  • China (as recorded)
  • Soviet Union (as recorded)
  • Spain (as recorded)
  • Europe (as recorded)
  • Massachusetts (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Cuba (as recorded)
  • China (as recorded)
  • Soviet Union (as recorded)
  • Ohio (as recorded)
  • Massachusetts (as recorded)
  • Europe (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Massachusetts (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Cuba (as recorded)
  • Michigan (as recorded)
  • New Hampshire (as recorded)
  • Maine (as recorded)