Heys, John Edward, 1948-

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1948-04-24

Biographical notes:

John Edward Heys is an actor, artist, and gay activist. He was the editor and co-founder of Gay Power magazine, 1969-1970.

From the description of John Edward Heys collection, 1969-2009 (bulk 1995-2009). (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 683265893

Actor/performer John Edward Heys (born 1948) appeared with numerous performance groups, including the Angels of Light and Charles Ludlam's Ridiculous Theatrical Company, but also became known for one-man shows, including his portrayal of Diana Vreeland.

Heys, who was born in New Jersey, moved to New York City in 1967 and became a part of that city's downtown art and performance scene. He began his career as an usher, then stage manager and designer for the performance artist, Ethyl Eichelberger. During the 1970s, he was a member of the New York-based drag troupe, Angels of Light, an offshoot of the San Francisco group, the Cockettes(though he never was a member of the Cockettes). In addition to appearances in New York, in such productions as the Palm Casino Revues, Heys also worked with both groups in San Francisco. A onetime lover of Charles Ludlam, Heys acted in several of his Ridiculous Theatrical Company productions during the 1980s. He starred as Moderna 83 in Le Bourgeois Avant-Garde (1982), Aristotle Plato Socrates Odysseus in Galas (1983), and as Schahabarim in Salammbo (1985). In addition to his work with Ludlam, Heys also collaborated on experimental theatre productions with many other notable artists during this period, including Jackie Curtis, Gary Indiana, Cookie Mueller, Tomata du Plenty, and Bill Vehr. He also was a favorite model of photographers, including Peter Hujar. Heys created several one-man shows, beginning with an autobiographical monologue, The Childhood Show. In 1982, he presented La Mamounia (Crime Doesn't Pay Interest), an autobiographical show written and performed at the Open Gate Theatre at Bellevue Hospital. In 1983, he performed La Mamounia in Berlin, where he would later settle. His acclaimed portrayal of Diana Vreeland was first performed in New York at La MaMa E.T.C. in the early 1990s and at several other venues in subsequent years. By the late 1990s, Heys was working more often as a director than a performer. In 1997, he directed socialite Alba Clemente in a New York stage production of Jean Cocteau's A Human Voice, with a new translation by Rene Ricard, as well as a short documentary film, co-created with Matthias Küntzel, concerning Charlotte von Mahlsdorf, which premiered at the Berlin International Film Festival.

From the description of John Edward Heys papers, ca. 1962-2001 (bulk 1969-2000) (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 84658162

John Edward Heys was born in New Jersey on April 24, 1944, although his birth date is frequently, though incorrectly, given as 1948. He moved to New York in 1967. Heys is an actor, writer, and director who performed with groups such as the Angels of Light and Charles Ludlam's Ridiculous Theatrical Company. Heys knew and worked with numerous artists including Charles Ludlam, Ethyl Eichelberger, Jackie Curtis, Cookie Mueller, Bill Vehr, Tomata du Plenty, Gary Indiana, and the Cockettes.

Heys began his career as an usher then worked as a stage manager and designer for Ethyl Eichelberger. He was a member of the New York based Angels of Light and performed in several of the Palm Casino Revues in the 1970s. A onetime lover of Charles Ludlam, Heys acted in several Ridiculous Theatrical Company productions. He starred as Moderna 83 in Le Bourgeois Avant-Garde (1982), Aristotle Plato Socrates Odysseus in Galas (1983), and as Schahabarim in Salammbo (1985).

In the 1980s, Heys acted in several shows with Cookie Mueller including A Car Story & Two Chin People. He acted in Gary Indiana's The Roman Polanski Story in 1981 and then in Indiana's Roman a Clef. In 1987, he was one of the celebrated ensemble members of Excerpts from Champagne & Glamour, Glory, & Gold by Jackie Curtis. Heys was also a favorite model of photographers including Peter Hujar.

Heys performed several one-man shows beginning with an autobiographical monologue in the 1980s, The Childhood Show. In 1982, he presented La Mamounia (Crime Doesn't Pay Interest), an autobiographical show written and performed at the Open Gate Theatre at Bellevue Hospital. In 1983, he performed La Mamounia in Berlin. He presented his Moroccan Bride, based on his trips to Morocco and Spain, in New York in the 1980s and in Berlin in 1997.

His celebrated portrayal of Diana Vreeland was performed in New York at La Mama in the early 1990s, at Ellen Stewart's 30th anniversary celebration at La Mama in 1992, and in Berlin in 1997 as The Empress V at Goodbye to Berlin? 100 Jahre Schwulenbewegung. He also created A Diana Vreeland Christmas for La Mama in 1991.

In 1997, he directed Alba Clemente in Rene Ricard's translation of Jean Cocteau's A Human Voice, and his short documentary film co-created with Matthias Küntzel concerning Charlotte von Mahlsdorf premiered at the Berlin International Film Festival.

In the 2000s, Heys directed the films Golden Earrings (2000), Alarm (2001), Cooch Dance (2008), The La Ronde Superclub (2008), Das Ende des Schweins ist der Anfang der Wurst (2009), Charlotte (2009), Warum Madam Warum (2011), and A Lazy Summer Afternoon (2011). He has introduced many of these films at film festivals in Europe, most frequently at the Berlin Film Festival.

Heys currently lives in Berlin.

From the guide to the John Heys papers, Additions, 1930s-2011, (The New York Public Library. Billy Rose Theatre Division.)

John Edward Heys was born in New Jersey on April 24, 1944. He moved to New York in 1967. Heys is an actor/performer who performed with numerous performance groups including the Angels of Light, the Cockettes, and Charles Ludlam's Ridiculous Theatrical Company. Heys knew and worked with numerous artists including Charles Ludlam, Ethyl Eichelberger, Jackie Curtis, Cookie Mueller, Bill Vehr, Tomata du Plenty, and Gary Indiana

Heys began his career as an usher then stage manager and designer for Ethyl Eichelberger. He was a member of the New York based Angels of Light and the Cockettes and performed in several of the Palm Casino Revues in the 1970s. A onetime lover of Charles Ludlam, Heys acted in several Ridiculous Theatrical Company productions. He starred as Moderna 83 in Le Bourgeois Avant-Garde (1982), Aristotle Plato Socrates Odysseus in Galas (1983), and as Schahabarim in Salammbo (1985).

In the 1980s Heys acted in several shows with Cookie Mueller including A Car Story and Two Chin People . He acted in Gary Indiana's The Roman Polanski Story in 1981 and then in Indiana's ca. 1984 Roman a Clef . In 1987 he was one of the celebrated ensemble members for Excerpts from Champagne & Glamour, Glory, & Gold by Jackie Curtis . Heys was also a favorite model of photographers including Peter Hujar.

Heys performed several one-man shows beginning with an autobiographical monologue in 1980s The Childhood Show . In 1982 he presented La Mamounia (Crime Doesn't Pay Interest), an autobiographical show written and performed at the Open Gate Theatre at Bellevue Hospital. In 1983 he performed La Mamounia in Berlin. He presented his Moroccan Bride based on his trips to Morocco and Spain in New York in the 1980s and in Berlin in 1997. His celebrated portrayal of Diana Vreeland was performed in New York at La Mama in the early 1990s, at Ellen Stewart's 30th Anniversary celebration at La Mama in 1992, and in Berlin in 1997 as The Empress V at Goodbye to Berlin? 100 Jahre Schwulenbewegung . He also created A Diana Vreeland Christmas for La Mama in 1991. In 1997 he directed Alba Clemente in Rene Ricard's translation of Jean Cocteau's A Human Voice . and his short documentary film co-created with Matthias Küntzel concerning Charlotte von Mahlsdorf premiered at the Berlin International Film Festival.

Heys currently lives in Berlin.

From the guide to the John Edward Heys papers, circa 1962-2001, 1969-2000, (The New York Public Library. Billy Rose Theatre Division.)

John Edward Heys was born in New Jersey on April 24, 1944, although his birth date is frequently, though incorrectly, given as 1948. He moved to New York in 1967. Heys is an actor, writer, and director who performed with groups such as the Angels of Light and Charles Ludlam's Ridiculous Theatrical Company. Heys knew and worked with numerous artists including Charles Ludlam, Ethyl Eichelberger, Jackie Curtis, Cookie Mueller, Bill Vehr, Tomata du Plenty, Gary Indiana, and the Cockettes.

Heys began his career as an usher then worked as a stage manager and designer for Ethyl Eichelberger. He was a member of the New York based Angels of Light and performed in several of the Palm Casino Revues in the 1970s. A onetime lover of Charles Ludlam, Heys acted in several Ridiculous Theatrical Company productions. He starred as Moderna 83 in Le Bourgeois Avant-Garde (1982), Aristotle Plato Socrates Odysseus in Galas (1983), and as Schahabarim in Salammbo (1985).

In the 1980s, Heys acted in several shows with Cookie Mueller including A Car Story & Two Chin People. He acted in Gary Indiana's The Roman Polanski Story in 1981 and then in Indiana's Roman a Clef. In 1987, he was one of the celebrated ensemble members of Excerpts from Champagne & Glamour, Glory, & Gold by Jackie Curtis. Heys was also a favorite model of photographers including Peter Hujar.

Heys performed several one-man shows beginning with an autobiographical monologue in the 1980s, The Childhood Show. In 1982, he presented La Mamounia (Crime Doesn't Pay Interest), an autobiographical show written and performed at the Open Gate Theatre at Bellevue Hospital. In 1983, he performed La Mamounia in Berlin. He presented his Moroccan Bride, based on his trips to Morocco and Spain, in New York in the 1980s and in Berlin in 1997.

His celebrated portrayal of Diana Vreeland was performed in New York at La Mama in the early 1990s, at Ellen Stewart's 30th anniversary celebration at La Mama in 1992, and in Berlin in 1997 as The Empress V at Goodbye to Berlin? 100 Jahre Schwulenbewegung. He also created A Diana Vreeland Christmas for La Mama in 1991.

In 1997, he directed Alba Clemente in Rene Ricard's translation of Jean Cocteau's A Human Voice, and his short documentary film co-created with Matthias Küntzel concerning Charlotte von Mahlsdorf premiered at the Berlin International Film Festival.

In the 2000s, Heys directed the films Golden Earrings (2000), Alarm (2001), Cooch Dance (2008), The La Ronde Superclub (2008), Das Ende des Schweins ist der Anfang der Wurst (2009), Charlotte (2009), Warum Madam Warum (2011), and A Lazy Summer Afternoon (2011). He has introduced many of these films at film festivals in Europe, most frequently at the Berlin Film Festival.

Heys currently lives in Berlin.

From the guide to the John Edward Heys collection, 1969-2009, (The New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division.)

Loading...

Loading Relationships

Information

Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w60v9n89
Ark ID:
w60v9n89
SNAC ID:
75754442

Subjects:

  • Gays
  • Gays in popular culture--Germany--20th century
  • Nightlife--New York (State)--New York
  • Gay artists--New York (State)--New York (N.Y.)
  • Female impersonators--United States
  • Transvestites
  • Experimental theater--New York (State)--New York
  • AIDS (Disease) in art--United States
  • Gay liberation movement--United States
  • Gay activists--New York (State)--New York
  • Performance art--Germany--Berlin
  • Monodramas
  • Gays in popular culture--United States--20th century
  • Nightlife--Germany--Berlin
  • Female impersonators
  • AIDS (Disease) in art--Germany
  • Performance art--New York (State)--New York
  • Performance artists
  • Experimental theater
  • Transvestites--New York (State)--New York
  • Gay actors
  • Gay liberation movement--Periodicals
  • Pornography

Occupations:

  • Writer
  • Performance artists
  • Female impersonators
  • Directors
  • Actors

Places:

  • Germany--Berlin (as recorded)
  • Berlin (Germany) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • New York (N.Y.) (as recorded)
  • New York (State)--New York (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • New York (State)--New York (as recorded)