Dumas, Alexandre, 1802-1870

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1802-07-24
Death 1870-12-06
French
Spanish; Castilian, Italian, English, French

Biographical notes:

Dumas, the French novelist. Jacques François Fromental Élie Halévy, usually known as Fromental Halévy, was a French composer.

From the description of [Letter, undated, to] M. Halévy / A. Dumas. (Smith College). WorldCat record id: 225160848

His last, unfinished, historical romance. Never published in French in book form.

From the description of Le comte de Moret : manuscript, [ca. 1869]. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 612780552

French novelist, dramatist, and political activist. Author of works such as "Le comte de Monte-Cristo" and "Les trois mousquetaires."

From the description of Alexandre Dumas correspondence, 1830-186?. (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 68805397

French novelist and dramatist. Author of works such as "Le comte de Monte-Cristo" and "Les trois mousquetaires." During the time this essay was written, Dumas was aligned with the Italian Revolutionary general, Guiseppe Garibaldi, in his effort to create a united Italy.

From the description of Syracuse et Noto : holograph, [1862]. (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 68805977

French novelist and dramatist.

From the description of Autograph letter signed : [n.p.], to "Mon Cher Denain", [n.d.]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270741752

From the description of La tour de Nesle, drame in cinq actes : playscript, [1832]. (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 34364089

From the description of Alexandre Dumas collection, 1830-1952. (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 66895329

French novelist and dramatist. Author of works such as "Le comte de Monte-Cristo" and "Les trois mousquetaires."

From the description of Le colonel Fumel; holograph, [186?]. (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 68806258

From the description of Commentary on memorials in Naples, manuscript, 1862. (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 68805981

From the description of Urbain Grandier ; Prologue, 1er tableau / [Alexandre Dumas and Auguste Maquet] : manuscript, [1849?] Oct. 29-30. (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 68805982

From the description of L'archevê̂̂que de Varsovie; holograph, [1863?]. (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 68806247

From the description of Notes on French troop movements in Northern Italy, ca. 1799, holograph, [18??]. (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 68805984

From the description of Chronique du 20 août, holograph, [186?]. (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 68805983

From the description of Programmes á l'usage de Mssr. les préfets, holograph, [18??] (University of Michigan). WorldCat record id: 68805987

French author.

From the description of Autograph draft of a letter signed : [n.p.], to [Queen Marie Amélie of France], [n.d.]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270741770

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Manheim [sic], to M. Saphir, [no year] Sept. 26. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270741756

French novelist.

From the description of Le monte-cristo : journal hebdomadaire de romans, d'histoire, de voyages et de poésie : autograph manuscript fragment, [ca. 1857]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 709606548

Alexandre Dumas, author of source material. Adapted collaboratively by the Company, Theatre de la Jeune Lune.

From the description of The three musketeers: typescript, 1996. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122576311

Alexandre Dumas, père, was the author of numerous historical novels, including The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers.

Alphonse Royer was a librettist and historian of the theater. He served as director of the Paris theater l'́Odeon from 1853-1856 and, later, of l'Opéra national.

From the description of [Note, ca. 1860? to Alphonse] Royer. (University of South Florida). WorldCat record id: 70203125

Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870) was a French author, novelist, and playwright best known for his historical novels, including The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers .

Alexandre Dumas was born July 24, 1802 in Villers-Cotterrêts, France to Marie-Louise-Elisabeth Labouret and Thomas-Alexandre Dumas Davy de la Pailleterie. Dumas's father died in 1806, placing a financial strain on the family. In 1816 financial circumstances required that Dumas seek work, so Dumas began serving as an errand boy for a family friend. In 1819, Dumas met Adolphe Ribbing de Leuven who would become a friend and literary collaborator. On April 10, 1823, Dumas began working as part of the secretarial staff for Louis-Philippe, Duc d'Orléans on account of Dumas's exquisite penmanship.

On July 27, 1824, Dumas's mistress, Marie-Catherine-Laure Labay, gave birth to a son, Alexandre; however, Dumas did not legally recognize the child until 1831. In February 1828, Dumas was transferred to the Duc d'Orléans forestry office, where he was allowed to focus on his own literary work after completing his work for the day. In many ways this was the start of Dumas's successful career as a playwright and novelist.

Dumas married Ida Ferrier on February 5, 1840, though the couple legally separated in October 1844. He died December 5, 1870 at his son's home in Dieppe.

[adapted from the Dictionary of Literary Biography [online] (1998)]

From the guide to the Alexandre Dumas Collection, 1850-1886, (Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Libraries)

Alexandre Dumas pere is probably best known for his classic novel, The Three Musketeers, published in 1844, but he also wrote plays, other novels and memoirs.

  • 1802, July 28: Born in Viller-Colterets, the son of Haitian born mulatto, Thomas Alexandre Dumas, and Marie Labouret Dumas, a Frenchwoman.
  • 1823: Moved to Paris and worked as a copying clerk in the office of the Duke of Orleans.
  • 1824: Birth of his illegitimate son, Alexandre Dumas Fils.
  • 1840: Marriage to Ida Ferrier.
  • 1844: Publication of The Three Musketeers and Monte Cristo.
  • 1847: Opening of Dumas' Theatre, the Historique.
  • 1848: Candidate for election to the Chamber of Deputies, which he lost. Leaves Paris for Brussels.
  • 1851: Voluntarily exiles himself to Brussels after the coup d'etat in France.
  • 1853: Returns to Paris
  • 1857 - 1864 : Travels to England, Russia, Sicily and Naples
  • 1870: Died near Dieppe

From the guide to the Alexandre Dumas Collection, ca. 1863, (Moorland-Spingarn Research Center, Howard University)

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Subjects:

  • Authors, French--19th century--Biography
  • French drama (comedy)--19th century
  • Crime--19th century
  • French drama 19th century
  • Literature--French
  • Second Coalition, War of the, 1798-1801--Campaigns
  • Memorials--19th century
  • Theater
  • Authors, French
  • Authors, French--Family relationships--19th century
  • Novelists, French
  • French drama--19th century--History and criticism
  • Prefects (French government)--Selection and appointment--19th century
  • Dramatists, French--19th century
  • Authors, French--Relations with women--19th century
  • French literature--19th century

Occupations:

  • Authors
  • Librettists
  • Novelists

Places:

  • Poland (as recorded)
  • Italy (as recorded)
  • Sicily (Italy) (as recorded)
  • France (as recorded)
  • Naples (Kingdom) (as recorded)
  • Spain (as recorded)
  • Italy (as recorded)
  • Syracuse (Italy) (as recorded)
  • France (as recorded)
  • France (as recorded)
  • Cisalpine Republic (as recorded)
  • Naples (Italy) (as recorded)
  • Italy, Southern (as recorded)
  • Mediterranean Sea (as recorded)
  • Calabria (Italy) (as recorded)
  • Noto (Italy) (as recorded)