Beauregard, G. T. (Gustave Toutant), 1818-1893

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1818-05-28
Death 1893-02-20
Americans
English, French

Biographical notes:

P.G.T. Beauregard was a Confederate States Army general from New Orleans, Louisiana. The Aztec Club was organized in 1847 as a fraternal society for officers serving under General Winfield Scott's command in Mexico City. Several officers later became major Civil War leaders.

From the description of Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard letter, 1892 Dec. 29. (Louisiana State University). WorldCat record id: 70294149

Former Confederate general and resident of New Orleans. At the time of this letter was written Phillips was an editor and book reviewer for 33 years with the New York Times.

From the description of Letter : New Orleans, to Barnet Phillips, New York, NewYork, 1884 November 19. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122498142

Confederate brigadier general, president of the New Orleans, Jackson and Mississippi Railway, and adjutant general of Louisiana; resident of New Orleans, La.

From the description of Papers, 1844-1893. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 19248071

From the description of Papers, 1860-1870. (Duke University Library). WorldCat record id: 32305534

Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was an engineer, author, and military officer, of New Orleans, La.; graduated, 1838, from the U.S. Military Aceadmy (West Point); served as lieutenant in U.S. Army during the Mexican War and as a general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War; lieutenant of engineers, fortification work in Louisiana, 1846; chief engineer in charge of draining site of New Orleans, 1858-1861; president of New Orleans, Jackson and Mississippi railway, 1865-1870; manager, Louisiana lottery, 1870-1888; Commissioner of Public Works, New Orleans, La., 1888; son of Jacques Toutant-Beauregard and Helene Judith (Deggio) Toutant-Beauregard; husband of Laura Villere and Caroline Delonde.

From the description of G.T. Beauregard papers, 1861-1893. (University of South Carolina). WorldCat record id: 41867241

U.S. and Confederate Army officer, engineer, railroad executive, and public official. Full name: Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard.

From the description of G.T. Beauregard papers, 1844-1883 (bulk 1861-1865). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70979982

Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was a Confederate general in the American Civil War. He was the author of Principles and Maxims of the Art of War (1863) and Report on the Defense of Charleston (1864).

From the description of Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard letter, 1872. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 276429495

Born Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard in New Orleans, La.; served in U.S. Army during Mexican War; resigned from U.S. Army, 1861; appointed brigadier general in Confederate Army, 1861.

From the description of G.T. Beauregard letter, 1856 Feb. 8. (Maine Historical Society Library). WorldCat record id: 71129841

American businessman, politician, and soldier. He served as a General in the Confederate Army.

From the description of Letter, 1861. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122367756

G. T. (Gustave Toutant) Beauregard (1818-1893) was a career soldier who attained the rank of brigadier general in the Confederate Army. He commanded forces at Fort Sumter and First Manassas, and assumed command at Shiloh following General Johnston's death. He commanded the forces at Charleston, holding the city for two years. He was an important historian, and published MAXIMA OF THE ART OF WAR in 1863. These photocopies are chiefly letters from Beauregard to military and civil officers, including Samuel Cooper (1798-1876), adjutant and inspector general, who later became a full general, the highest ranking officer in the Confederacy, and a close friend of Jefferson Davis; George Wythe Randolph (1818-1867) Secretary of War for the Confederacy; William Preston Johnston (1831-1899) colonel aide-de-camp to Pres. Davis; John Horace Forney (1829-1902), a career Army officer who rose to the rank of brigadier general in the Confederate Army and commanded the District of the Gulf; Gustavus W. Smith (1822-1896), civil and military engineer and a major general in the confederate Army, commanding Peninsular campaign following the wounding of Gen. Johnston and the arrival of Gen. Lee; and a letter to Charles J. Villere, important member of the Confederate Congress and brother-in-law of Beauregard, from R. L. Brodie, Confederate surgeon.

From the description of Papers, 1861-1863. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 145408219

G. T. Beauregard was a Confederate States Army general of New Orleans, La. Edward Clifton Wharton, also of New Orleans, was Confederate Army major and a journalist.

From the description of P.G.T. Beauregard letters, 1858-1886. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122520198

American businessman, politician and soldier. He served as a general for the Confederacy during the American Civil War (1861-1865).

From the description of Portrait and autographs, 1863-1892. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 82639464

Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard was born at his family's plantation in St. Bernard Parish, near New Orleans, Louisiana. He was the son of Jacques Toutant-Beauregard, a planter, and Helene Judith de Reggio. He was educated in private schools in New Orleans and New York, then attended the U.S. Military Academy (West Point), graduating second in the class of 1838. As a commissioned officer, he was involved in engineering projects in Florida and Louisiana. In 1841, he married Marie Laure Villère, whose grandfather was the first native-born governor of Louisiana. They had two sons; she died in 1850. G. T. Beauregard served with distinction in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War. Returning to Louisiana, he resumed engineering duties, and married Caroline Deslonde in 1860, who died in 1864. With the secession of Louisiana, he had resigned his commission in 1861, and enlisted in the Confederate Army as a private in a volunteer company. Jefferson Davis appointed Beauregard a brigadier general in the CSA; he served in Charleston, S.C., supervising the bombardment of Fort Sumter, as well as at Manassas, Virginia. He was promoted to full general and assigned to the western theater in 1862, where he had responsibilities to oversee Confederate armies in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and the Carolinas. After the war, Beauregard returned to New Orleans, becoming president of the New Orleans, Jackson & Mississippi Railroad from 1865 to 1870. He became manager of the Louisiana State Lottery Company in 1877, then commissioner of public works in New Orleans in 1888. He died in 1893, and his remains were interred in Metairie Cemetery.

From the description of G. T. Beauregard papers, 1839-1888. (Tulane University). WorldCat record id: 302365685

Confederate general.

From the description of Autograph letter signed : New Orleans, to James M. Dalzell, [18]85 Oct. 22. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270623433

From the description of Letters : Richmond, Va., from Leroy and Matilda Pope Walker, 1861 Sept. 14. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122626103

From the description of G.T. Beauregard : miscellaneous papers, 1862-1866. (Filson Historical Society, The). WorldCat record id: 46719903

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Mobile, Alabama, to General Ruggles, 1862 Sept. 11. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270623211

Born Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard, in New Orleans, La.; served in U.S. Army during Mexican War; resigned from U.S. Army, 1861; appointed brigadier general in Confederate Army, 1861.

From the description of Civil War letter of Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard , 1862 Mar. 6. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 166428882

G. T. Beauregard was a general in the Confederate Army.

From the description of Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard letter, 1888 Mar. 16. (Louisiana State University). WorldCat record id: 122573922

G.T. Beauregard (1818-1893), Confederate Army officer.

From the description of G.T. Beauregard papers, 1861-1893. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 173863350

Confederate general; full name Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard.

From the description of Report of the Battle of Manassa[s] : manuscript, [1861]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122475243

From the description of ATS, 1864 July 7, near Petersburg, Va., to Robert E. Lee. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122625907

From the description of ALS : Manassas Junction, Va., to Samuel Cooper, Richmond, Va, 1861 June 11. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122625939

From the description of ATS, 1865 Feb. 21, Chesterville, S.C., to Jefferson Davis, Richmond, Va. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122490195

From the description of Papers, 1864-1881. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122625918

From the description of Letter [draft], 1861 June 12, Manassas, Va., to Jefferson Davis. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122625923

From the description of TS, 1865 Apr. 26, Greensboro, N.C., to Lunsford Lindsay Lomax, Danville, Va. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 86138910

From the description of Notes on the defense of Charleston, S.C., [between 1864 and 1893]. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122525027

From the description of Proclamation : manuscript signed, 1861 [June, no day], Manassas Junction, Va. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122524933

From the description of ATS, 1864 Dec. 21, Pocotaglio, S.C., to Jefferson Davis, Richmond, Va. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122580857

From the description of ALS, 1865 April 21, Greensboro, N.C., to Mansfield Lovell, Columbia, S.C. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 86156111

From the description of Papers, 1861-1865. (Rosenbach Museum & Library). WorldCat record id: 122540621

G. T. Beauregard was a Confederate States Army general of New Orleans, Louisiana. His son, Rene Toutant Beauregard, was married to Clemence Cenas, the daughter of Hilary B. Cenas and Marguerite Pierce Cenas.

From the description of Pierre G.T. Beauregard and family papers, 1818-1912 (bulk 1850-1880). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122467783

Confederate Army officer.

From the description of Papers, 1861-1893. (Emory University). WorldCat record id: 28418084

Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard (1818-1893) was born in Louisiana. He studied civil engineering at West Point and served as an engineer in the Mexican-American War. Following the succession of the Southern states in 1861, Beauregard became the first Confederate brigadier general. He commanded the Confederate defenses at Fort Sumter in April 1861, and also served in the First Battle of Bull Run, the Battle of Shiloh, and the Siege of Corinth, before surrendering to William T. Sherman in 1865. After the war Beauregard worked as general superindendent of the New Orleans, Jackson, and Great Northern Railroad, and was also president of the New Orleans and Carrollton Street Railway. He was appointed supervisor of the Louisiana Lottery in 1877. He died in New Orleans in 1893.

From the description of Letter to Senator John Slidell, 1858, February 9. (Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens). WorldCat record id: 779641229

Confederate general in charge of coastal defenses for South Carolina and Georgia, and particularly Charleston, S.C.

From the description of Letter : Charleston, S.C., to Rev. John T. Wightman, 1862 April 12. (The South Carolina Historical Society). WorldCat record id: 37522783

P.G.T. Beauregard of New Orleans, La., graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1838. He served in the Mexican War and directed the building of the Federal customs house in New Orleans. Beauregard was a full general in the Confederate States Army during the Civil War, serving at Fort Sumter, the First Battle of Manassas, the Battle of Shiloh, and the Second Battle of Petersburg, among others. After the war, he served as president of two Louisiana railway companies and as manager of the Louisiana Lottery.

From the description of Beauregard miscellany, 1839-1918 (bulk 1861-1865). (Louisiana State University). WorldCat record id: 298828363

Born in Saint Bernard Parish, Louisiana; graduate of West Point and veteran of the Mexican War; service with the Confederate Army at Fort Sumter, First Manassas, Shiloh, and Corinth; in command of forces in the Carolinas, Georgia, and Virginia.

From the description of Papers, 1862-1863. (University of Southern Mississippi, Regional Campus). WorldCat record id: 15799424

Military engineer; lieutenant, Mexican War; general, Confederate Army, Civil War.

West Point graduate, 1838; lieutenant of engineers, fortification work in Louisiana, 1846; chief engineer in charge of draining site of New Orleans, 1858-1861; president, New Orleans, Jackson and Mississippi railway, 1865-1870; manager, Louisiana lottery, 1870-1888; commissioner of public works, New Orleans, 1888; adjutant general of Louisiana; author of books about military operations.

From the description of Document [contemporary copy]: Charleston, [S.C.], 1862 Sept. 24. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 26962405

Military engineer; lieutenant, Mexican War; general, Confederate Army, Civil War.

West Point graduate, 1838; lieutenant of engineers, fortification work in Louisiana, 1846; chief engineer in charge of draining site of New Orleans, 1858-1861; manager, Louisiana lottery, 1870-1888; commissioner of public works, New Orleans, 1888; adjutant general of Louisiana; author of books about military operations.

From the description of Notes: N[ew] O[rleans, La.], 1876 July 17. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 26962414

Military engineer; lieutenant, Mexican War; general, Confederate Army, Civil War.

West Point graduate, 1838; lieutenant of engineers, fortification work in Louisiana, 1846; chief engineer in charge of draining site of New Orleans, 1858-1861; manager, Louisiana lottery, 1870-1888; commissioner of public works, New Orleans, 1888; adjutant general of Louisiana; author of books about military operations.

From the description of Letter: New Orleans, [La.], to Eugene L. Didier, Baltimore, Md., [18]82 July 10. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 27045458

Military engineer; lieutenant, Mexican War; general, Confederate Army, Civil War.

West Point graduate, 1838; lieutenant of engineers, fortification work in Louisiana, 1846; chief engineer in charge of draining site of New Orleans, 1858-1861; president, New Orleans, Jackson and Mississippi railway, 1865-1870; manager, Louisiana lottery, 1870-1888; commissioner of public works, New Orleans, 1888; adjutant general of Louisiana; author of books about military operations.

From the description of Journal: 1847 March 2-26. (Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library). WorldCat record id: 26962398

Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard was born May 28, 1818 near New Orleans, Louisiana. He was a Confederate general in the American Civil War. Beauregard graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y. (1838) and served in the Mexican War (1846-1848). After the secession of Louisiana from the Union (January 1861), Beauregard resigned from the U.S. Army and was commissioned a brigadier general in the Confederate Army; he eventually became one of the eight full generals of the Confederacy and particpated in almost every important theatre of the war. He commanded the forces that bombarded Fort Sumter, S.C., and was on the field at the First Battle of Bull Run (1861), and assumed command at Shiloh after the death of General Albert Sidney Johnston (1862). He later conducted the defense of Charleston and toward the end of the war defended the southern approaches to Richmond. Though he proved to be a capable combat commander and often displayed sound strategic sense, Beauregard revealed serious deficiencies as a general officer. His penchant for questioning orders bordered on insubordination. He died on February 20, 1893 in New Orleans. Britannica Online Encyclopedia http://search.eb.com (Retrieved November 18, 2008)

Howell Cobb was born Spetember 7, 1815 in Jefferson County, Georgia. He was a Georgia politician who championed Southern unionism during the 1850s but then advocated immediate secession following the election of Abraham Lincoln. Cobb served in Congress from 1842 to 1851 and agina from 1855 to 1857; he supported the annexation of Texas, the war with Mexico, and the extension of slavery into the territories. But he broke with the most extreme proslavery Southerners when he advocated extending the Missouri Compromise line to the Pacific, opposed the creation of a sectional political party, and supported the Compromise of 1850. He died in New York City on October 9, 1868. Britannica Online Encyclopedia http://search.eb.com (Retrieved November 18, 2008)

From the description of P. G. T. Beauregard telegram, 1865, 2 January. (University of Georgia). WorldCat record id: 300061524

G.T. Beauregard was a Confederate General.

He was born in 1818 in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana and graduated from West Point in 1838. Beauregard commanded troops at Fort Sumter in 1861, and he was named full general after the Battle of 1st Bull Run. Beauregard died in New Orleans in 1893.

From the description of G.T. Beauregard letter, 1873. (Johns Hopkins University). WorldCat record id: 49301355

Biographical Note

  • 1818, May 28: Born near New Orleans, La.
  • 1838: Graduated, United States Military Academy, West Point, N.Y.
  • 1841: Married Laure Villere
  • 1846: Served as an engineer on staff of General Winfield Scott in Mexico
  • 1847: Took part in Mexican War battles of Vera Cruz, Cerro Gordo, Contreras, and Mexico City
  • 1853: Promoted to captain, United States Army
  • 1858 - 1861 : Chief engineer in charge of draining the site of New Orleans, La.
  • 1860: Married Caroline Deslonde
  • 1861: Superintendent of United States Military Academy, West Point, N.Y., for five days Resigned from United States Army Appointed brigadier general, Confederate Army, in command of forces at Charleston, S.C. Commanding officer, Department of Alexandria Commanding officer, 1st Corps, Army of the Potomac Promoted to general, Confederate Army
  • 1862: Assistant to General Albert Sidney Johnston, Confederate Army Commander, Army of the Mississippi Commanding officer, Western Department Commander, Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, with headquarters at Charleston, S.C.
  • 1864: Commander, Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia, Confederate Army Commander, Military Division of the West
  • 1865: Named second in command to General Joseph E. Johnston Chief engineer and general superintendent, New Orleans, Jackson, and Great Northern Railroad
  • 1866 - 1870 : President, New Orleans, Jackson, and Great Northern Railroad
  • 1866 - 1876 : President, New Orleans & Carrollton Railroad Co.
  • 1877 - 1893 : Supervisor, Louisiana lottery
  • 1879: Adjutant general of Louisiana
  • 1888: Commissioner of public works, New Orleans, La.
  • 1893, Feb. 20: Died, New Orleans, La.

From the guide to the G. T. Beauregard Papers, 1844-1883, (bulk 1861-1865), (Manuscript Division Library of Congress)

Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard (1818-1893), commonly referred to as G. T. Beauregard, was born on May 28, 1838, in Saint Bernard Parish, Louisiana. Beauregard attended the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, and graduated second in his class in 1838. He served in the Mexican War (1846-1848) as an engineer officer on the staff of General Winfield Scott (1786-1866). After the war, Beauregard was placed in charge of the Mississippi and Lake Defenses of Louisiana in 1848, a position he held until 1860. On January 23, 1861, he was appointed the superintendent of the United States Military Academy, but decided to relinquish his post and resign his commission from the United States Army after Louisiana seceded from the Union on January 26. In February 1861, Beauregard accepted a new commission as brigadier general for the Confederate Army. He was crucial in forcing the surrender of Fort Sumter on April 13, 1861, which began the American Civil War (1861-1865). Beauregard was named a full general in the Confederate Army in July 1861 and kept that position through the end of the war. After the Civil War, Beauregard returned to New Orleans where he engaged in politics and served as president of two railroad companies. G. T. Beauregard died on February 20, 1893.

From the guide to the G. T. Beauregard letter, Beauregard (G. T.) letter, 1857, (Redwood Library and Athenaeum)

From the guide to the Pierre G. T. Beauregard: York-Beauregard Papers, [ca. 1860]-1865., (Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library, )

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Subjects:

  • Morris Island, Battle of, S.C., 1863 (July 10-September 7)
  • Generals--Correspondence
  • Military planning--History--19th century
  • Reconstruction
  • Physicians--Biography
  • Generals--History--19th century
  • Secession
  • Petersburg Crater, Battle of, 1865
  • Railroads
  • Harbors--Design and construction
  • Generals--History
  • Mormons--History--19th century
  • Railroads--Louisiana--New Orleans
  • Revolvers
  • Indictments--History--Sources
  • Roofs--Maintenance and repair
  • Sherman's March through the Carolinas
  • French Americans--History
  • Shiloh, Battle of, Tenn., 1862
  • Lotteries--Louisiana
  • Public works
  • Engineering--History--19th century
  • Jetties
  • Military history, Modern--19th century
  • Cooking
  • Engineering--Louisiana--New Orleans
  • Utah Expedition, 1857-1858
  • Military engineers--History--19th century
  • Flags
  • Military history, Modern
  • Lotteries
  • Hospitals, Naval and marine
  • Bull Run, 1st Battle of, Va., 1861
  • Soldiers--Biography--Sources
  • Armored vessels
  • Generals--Portraits
  • Sherman's March to the Sea
  • Bull Run, 1st Battle of, Va., 1861--Sources
  • Generals--Archives
  • Cabinet officers--Correspondence
  • Engineering
  • Mexican War, 1846-1848
  • Atlanta Campaign, 1864
  • Roofs--Costs
  • African Americans--History--19th century
  • Mexican War, 1846-1848--Campaigns
  • Military history, Ancient

Occupations:

  • Army officers, Confederate
  • Engineers
  • Journalists--Louisiana
  • Public officials--Louisiana
  • Soldiers--Confederate States of America
  • Army officers
  • Soldiers--United States
  • Generals--Confederate States of America
  • Cabinet officers

Places:

  • France (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Charleston (S.C.) (as recorded)
  • Utah (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Charleston (S.C.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Georgia (as recorded)
  • Charleston (S.C.) (as recorded)
  • Tennessee (as recorded)
  • Charleston (S.C.) (as recorded)
  • Fort Sumter (Charleston, S.C.) (as recorded)
  • Petersburg (Va.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Fort Sumter (Charleston, S.C.) (as recorded)
  • New Orleans (La.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Maryland (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • South Carolina (as recorded)
  • Mexico (as recorded)
  • Charleston (S.C.) (as recorded)
  • Fort Pike (La.) (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Mississippi (as recorded)
  • South Carolina (as recorded)
  • Fort Sumter (Charleston, S.C.) (as recorded)
  • New Orleans (La.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Fort Jackson (La.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Petersburg (Va.) (as recorded)
  • Washington (D.C.) (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Louisiana (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Petersburg (Va.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Louisiana (as recorded)
  • Savannah (Ga.) (as recorded)
  • Bermuda Hundred (Va.) (as recorded)
  • Louisiana (as recorded)
  • Washington (D.C.) (as recorded)
  • Louisiana--New Orleans (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Tennessee (as recorded)
  • Louisiana--New Orleans (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • New Orleans (La.) (as recorded)
  • South Carolina (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • South Carolina (as recorded)
  • Tennessee (as recorded)
  • Mississippi River (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Magnolia Plantation (La.) (as recorded)
  • Corinth (Miss.) (as recorded)
  • Louisiana (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • South Carolina (as recorded)
  • Corinth (Miss.) (as recorded)
  • Kentucky (as recorded)
  • Generals--Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Fort McHenry (Baltimore, Md.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Mississippi (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • South Carolina (as recorded)
  • New Orleans (La.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Fort Wagner (S.C.) (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Charleston (S.C.) (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Fort Saint Philip (La.) (as recorded)
  • Veracruz (Mexico), Battle of, 1847 (as recorded)
  • Fort Sumter (Charleston, S.C.) (as recorded)
  • Georgia (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America (as recorded)
  • South Carolina (as recorded)
  • Petersburg (Va.) (as recorded)
  • Petersburg (Va.) (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • Louisiana (as recorded)
  • Virginia (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Louisiana (as recorded)
  • Louisiana--New Orleans (as recorded)
  • Charleston (S.C.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • New Orleans (La.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Louisiana (as recorded)
  • Confederate States of America, Army (as recorded)
  • Fort Sumter (Charleston, S.C.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Fort Sumter (Charleston, S.C.) (as recorded)