Alcott, Louisa May, 1832-1888

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1832-11-29
Death 1888-03-06
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

Alcott was an American author.

From the description of Papers, 1849-1931. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 612370872

From the description of Additional papers, 1845-1944. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 122505798

From the guide to the Additional papers, 1845-1944., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

Alcott was an American novelist and short story writer.

From the description of Louisa May Alcott additional papers, 1839-1888. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 612715144

From the guide to the Louisa May Alcott additional papers, 1839-1888., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

American poet, novelist, and short story writer best known for her classic "Little Women."

From the description of Papers, 1862-1888. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 122494542

From the guide to the Louisa May Alcott papers, 1862-1888, (L. Tom Perry Special Collections)

Louisa May Alcott was an American novelist, short-story writer, and poet.

From the description of Louisa May Alcott collection of papers, 1865-1884. (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122485951

From the guide to the Louisa May Alcott collection of papers, 1865-1884, (The New York Public Library. Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature.)

Louisa May Alcott was an American author.

From the guide to the Louisa May Alcott papers, 1849-1931., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

Louisa May Alcott was a female American author.

From the description of Louisa May Alcott additional papers, 1849-1887. (Harvard University). WorldCat record id: 612365215

Louisa May Alcott was an female American author.

From the guide to the Louisa May Alcott additional papers, 1849-1887., (Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University)

American author.

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Concord, to [George S.] Thatcher in Bangor, [1877] Mar. 6. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270131520

From the description of My kingdom : autograph manuscript (with signature attached) of the poem : [n.p.], [n.d.]. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270132657

From the description of Autograph letter signed "Lou" : Concord, to Miss Sophia Foord, 1862 May 11. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270131614

American author of novels, stories, and poetry, best known for Little Women and other juvenile novels. Sometime resident of Concord, Mass. Second daughter of Transcendentalist, educator, lecturer, and author A. Bronson Alcott and Abigail May Alcott. Born in Germantown, Penn., Nov. 29, 1832; died in Boston, Mass., Mar. 6, 1888. Her childhood was spent mainly in Boston and Concord. In 1843, she lived with her family at the Fruitlands utopian community in Harvard, Mass., returning to Concord in Jan. 1844. She was educated largely by her father, whose difficulty in supporting the family made it necessary for Louisa to contribute to the family income--as teacher, seamstress, governess, companion, domestic, and (ultimately and most successfully) writer. Louisa's Flower Fables (a collection of fairy stories written for Emerson's daughter Ellen) was published in 1855. Hospital Sketches (consisting of revised versions of Louisa's letters home from Georgetown during a stint as a Civil War nurse) was published in 1863. Moods appeared in 1864, the first part of Little Women in 1868, the second in 1869. With the publication of Little Women, her success, popular and financial, was assured. From that point, she turned out sequels to Little Women and other juvenile works with remarkable regularity. She wrote extensively for periodicals and took on the editorship of Merry's Museum in 1868. She published thrillers and potboilers pseudonymously under various names, notably as A.M. Barnard. Louisa May Alcott was a supporter of woman's suffrage and of temperance.

From the description of Louisa May Alcott papers, [1847]-1887. (Concord Public Library). WorldCat record id: 33423161

Alcott was an American novelist, particularly famous for the novel Little women.

Mary C. Pratt owned "The Wayside," a house in Concord, Massachusetts, in which she operated a boarding school for girls from 1873-1879.

Josephine Dutton taught there in 1873; her daughter, Josephine Webster, donated the letter to Smith College. "The Wayside" was owned by a number of prominent figures, including members of the literary Alcott and Hawthorne families, and is now a museum.

From the description of [Letters] / L. M. Alcott. (Smith College). WorldCat record id: 144730618

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Subjects:

  • American literature--Women authors
  • Illustration of books--19th century
  • Correspondence
  • Material Types
  • Children's literature
  • Women artists--United States--Biography--Sources
  • Authors and publishers
  • Copyright--Royalties
  • Poor--History--19th century
  • Women artists--United States--Correspondence
  • Ẁomen authors, American--Correspondence
  • Ciegos--Libros y lectura
  • American literature
  • Women artists--Biography--Sources
  • Concord, Battle of, Concord, Mass., 1775--Anniversaries, etc
  • American literature--19th century--Social aspects
  • Women authors, American--Biography--Sources
  • House cleaning
  • Homeopathy
  • Authors, American--19th century--Correspondence
  • Women authors, American
  • Wills
  • Publishers and Publishing
  • Manuscripts
  • Women artists--Correspondence
  • Women--Societies and clubs
  • American literature--19th century
  • Authors, American
  • Women--Suffrage

Occupations:

  • Women novelists--19th century
  • Women authors
  • Novelists, American--19th century
  • Artists

Places:

  • White Mountains (N.H. and Me.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Concord (Mass.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • Concord (Mass.) (as recorded)
  • United States (as recorded)
  • White Mountains (N.H. and Me.) (as recorded)
  • Concord (Mass.) (as recorded)
  • Cambridge (Mass.) (as recorded)
  • Massachusetts--Concord (as recorded)
  • Massachusetts--Boston (as recorded)