Hughes, Charles Evans, 1862-1948

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1862-04-11
Death 1948-08-27
Americans
English

Biographical notes:

Governor of New York State from 1907-1910; later served as associate justice and chief justice of the United States, and as U.S. secretary of state.

From the description of Charles Evans Hughes letters: Albany, to Frank H. Severance and Henry W. Hill, 1907, 1910. (Buffalo History Museum). WorldCat record id: 70794223

Charles Evans Hughes (1862-1948) was an American jurist and politician. He practiced law and held various political positions between 1884 and 1906. Twice elected governor of New York State, he resigned in 1910 to become an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court where he served until 1916. He returned to political life and was Secretary of State from 1921 to 1925. From 1926 to 1930 he held positions of judge for The Hague Tribunal Permanent Court of Arbitration and member of the Permanent Court of International Justice. He returned to the Supreme Court as Chief Justice in 1930 and served until his retirement in 1941.

From the guide to the Charles Evans Hughes papers, ca. 1904-ca. 1911, 1906-1910, (The New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division.)

Hughes received a B.A. from Brown University (1881) and a LL.B. from Columbia (1884). He practiced law in New York City and was counsel for the New York State legislative commission (Armstrong Commission). He served as Governor of New York (1907-1910) and as Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1910-1916). He was an unsuccessful candidate for President, defeated by Woodrow Wilson in 1916. Hughes was a member of the Hague Tribunal (1926-1930), and served as Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1930-1941).

From the description of Letters to Eldon James, 1927-1930. (Harvard Law School Library). WorldCat record id: 234339329

Charles Hughes was elected Governor of New York in 1908.

From the description of Charles E. Hughes typescript letter signed to Robert K. Mackey, New York, 1906 November 6. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 779287291

Charles Evans Hughes was governor of New York and later Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

From the description of Miscellaneous manuscripts, 1911. (University of Pennsylvania Library). WorldCat record id: 190822249

U.S. secretary of state, chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, and governor of New York.

From the description of Charles Evans Hughes papers, 1836-1950 (bulk 1905-1940). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 70980125

Albert Shaw (1857-1947) was an editor, journalist and scholar who spent most of his career as the editor and publisher of the Review of Reviews, a digest of progressive thought and political analysis. Shaw's principal interests were the improvement of municipal government, the relationship of business and organized labor, agricultural reform, international affairs, and contemporary politics and economics, topics which he wrote and spoke on frequently.

From the guide to the Albert Shaw papers, 1827-1953, 1890-1947, (The New York Public Library. Manuscripts and Archives Division.)

Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, 1930-1941; Secretary of State, 1921-1925; Associate Justice, U.S. Supreme Court, 1910-1916; Governor of N.Y., 1907-1910; student at Brown University, 1878-1881.

From the description of Charles Evans Hughes letters, 1878-1943. (Brown University). WorldCat record id: 82825079

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

Columbia University LL.B., 1884; LL.D., 1907.

From the description of Charles Evans Hughes papers, 1914-1930. (Columbia University In the City of New York). WorldCat record id: 496102546

Charles Evans Hughes (1862-1948) was an American jurist and politician.

He practiced law and held various political positions between 1884 and 1906. Twice elected governor of New York State, he resigned in 1910 to become an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court where he served until 1916. He returned to political life and was Secretary of State from 1921 to 1925. From 1926 to 1930 he held positions of judge for The Hague Tribunal Permanent Court of Arbitration and member of the Permanent Court of International Justice. He returned to the Supreme Court as Chief Justice in 1930 and served until his retirement in 1941.

From the description of Charles Evans Hughes papers, ca. 1904-ca. 1911, bulk (1906-1910). (New York Public Library). WorldCat record id: 122571196

Biographical Note

  • 1862, Apr. 11: Born, Glens Falls, N.Y.
  • 1881: A.B., Brown University, Providence, R.I.
  • 1884: A.M., Brown University, Providence, R.I. LL.B., Columbia University, New York, N.Y. Admitted to New York bar
  • 1884 - 1906 : Practiced law, New York, N.Y.
  • 1888: Married Antoinette Carter
  • 1891 - 1895 : Professor of law and special lecturer, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.
  • 1893 - 1900 : Special lecturer, New York Law School, New York, N.Y.
  • 1905 - 1906 : Counsel to Stevens Gas Commission and Armstrong Insurance Commission, New York state legislature
  • 1906: Special assistant to United States attorney general in coal investigation
  • 1907 - 1910 : Governor of New York
  • 1910 - 1916 : Associate justice, United States Supreme Court
  • 1916: Nominated for president of the United States by the Republican Party
  • 1917 - 1930 : Member, Hughes, Rounds, Schurman & Dwight, New York, N.Y.
  • 1921 - 1925 : Secretary of state
  • 1928: Chairman, United States delegation to the Sixth International Conference of American States, Havana, Cuba
  • 1928 - 1929 : Member, United States delegation to the International Conference on Arbitration and Conciliation, Washington, D.C.
  • 1928 - 1930 : Judge, Permanent Court of International Justice
  • 1930 - 1941 : Chief justice of the United States
  • 1930 - 1933 : President, Guatemala-Honduras Special Boundary Tribunal
  • 1948, Aug. 27: Died, Osterville, Mass.

From the guide to the Charles Evans Hughes Papers, 1836-1950, (bulk 1905-1940), (Manuscript Division Library of Congress)

Charles Evan Hughes (1862-1948) was an American lawyer and politician who served as Governor of New York, U.S. Secretary of State, and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

Charles Evan Hughes was born in Glen Falls, New York on April 11, 1862. His parents David Charles Hughes, a Methodist preacher, and Mary Connelly, a Baptist minister's daughter, were deeply religious. An intelligent child, Hughes began attending Madison College (presently Colgate University) at the age of fourteen before transferring to Brown University. He graduated first in his class from Columbia Law School and began practicing law in 1884. While working at the firm Chamberlin, Carter, and Hornblower, Hughes met his future wife, Antoinette Carter, the daughter of Walter S. Carter, a senior partner in the firm.

Hughes established himself politically by leading investigations into corporate corruption and the insurance industry. In 1906 he was elected Governor of New York. Four years later, President William Howard Taft appointed Hughes to the United States Supreme Court. Hughes left his Associate Justice position to run on the Republican nomination for President of the United States in 1916, but lost to Woodrow Wilson. After a few years in private practice, Hughes served as Secretary of State from 1921 to 1925 under Presidents Warren G. Harding and Calvin Coolidge. During his tenure, Hughes focused on various international efforts to avert another great war.

In 1930, President Herbert Hoover named Hughes the eleventh Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. The Hughes court faced the Great Depression and President Franklin D. Roosevelt's court-packing plan. While in this position Hughes also oversaw the opening of the Supreme Court building in 1935. He resigned his post in 1941. Hughes died in Cape Cod, Massachusetts on August 27, 1948.

  • 1909: Conditions of Progress in the Democratic Government
  • 1925: The Pathway of Peace, and Other Addresses
  • 1927: The Supreme Court of the United States
  • 1928: Our Relation with the Nations of the Western Hemisphere
  • 1929: Pan American Peace Plans

From the guide to the Charles Evan Hughes Letters, 1894-1934, (Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Libraries)

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Occupations:

  • Governors--New York (State)
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Places:

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  • New York (State) (as recorded)
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  • New York (State) (as recorded)
  • Honduras (as recorded)
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  • Chile (as recorded)