Baldwin, Stanley Baldwin, Earl, 1867-1947

Alternative names
Dates:
Birth 1867-08-03
Death 1947-12-14
Britons
English

Biographical notes:

Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947) was born on 3 August 1867 in Lower Park, Bewdley, the son of industrialist Alfred Baldwin. He was educated at Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge, before joining the family iron and steel business. He was elected a Conservative M.P. in 1906, and in December 1916 became Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Andrew Bonar Law. Thereafter, Baldwin served in David Lloyd George's government as Junior Lord of the Treasury, Financial Secretary to the Treasury and President of the Board of Trade. He became Chancellor of the Exchequer in 1922, and Prime Minister in 1923. Baldwin lost the 1929 General Election, but served as President of the Council in the new National Government, before replacing Ramsey MacDonald as Prime Minister in June 1935. He resigned in 1937, and was later made Earl Baldwin of Bewdley. He died on 14 December 1947.

From the guide to the Stanley Baldwin: Miscellaneous Letters, Newcuttings and Photographs, 1896-1982, (Cambridge University Library, Department of Manuscripts and University Archives)

English statesman.

From the description of Autograph letter signed with initials : Astley Hall, Stourport on Severn, to Sydney Carlyle Cockerell, 1940 May 22. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 426143643

From the description of Autograph letter signed : Astley Hall, Stourport on Severn, to Sir Sydney Cockerell, 1940 May 19. (Unknown). WorldCat record id: 270621984

Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947) was born on 3 August 1867 in Lower Park, Bewdley, the son of industrialist Alfred Baldwin. He was educated at Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge, before joining the family iron and steel business. He was elected a Conservative M.P. in 1906, and in December 1916 became parliamentary private secretary to the chancellor of the exchequer, Andrew Bonar Law. Thereafter Baldwin served in David Lloyd George's government as junior lord of the treasury, financial secretary to the treasury and president of the board of trade. He became chancellor of the exchequer in 1922, and prime minister in 1923. Baldwin lost the 1929 General Election, but served as president of the council in the new National Government, before replacing Ramsey MacDonald as prime minister in June 1935. He resigned in 1937, and was later made Earl Baldwin of Bewdley. He died on 14 December 1947.

From the guide to the Stanley Baldwin: Political Papers, 1906-1946, (Cambridge University Library, Department of Manuscripts and University Archives)

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1923-1924, 1924-1929, and 1935-1937, and Leader of the Conservative Party from 1923-1937.

From the description of Letter from Stanley Baldwin, 24 June 1926. (Cornell University Library). WorldCat record id: 676789584

1885-1888 studied at Trinity College, Cambridge; 1888-1917 worked in the family firm Baldwins Limited; 1908-c 1917 board member, the Great Western Railway; 1908-c 1917 board member, the Metropolitan Bank; 1908- Member of Parliament, Bewdley; 1916-1917 parliamentary private secretary to Lloyd George; 1917 junior lord of the Treasury; 1917-1921 financial secretary to the Treasury; 1920 privy councillor; 1921-1922 president of the board of trade; 1922-1923 Chancellor of the Exechequer; 1923 visited the United States to negotiate the repayment of war debt; 1923- leader of the Conservative party; 1923-1926 rector, the University of Edinburgh; 1923-1929 prime minister; 1928-1931 rector, the University of Glasgow; 1929-1947 chancellor, the University of St Andrews; 1929-1931 leader of the opposition; 1930-1947 chancellor, the University of Cambridge; 1931-1935 lord president of the council; 1935-1937 third prime minister; 1937 peerage, entered the House of Lords; 1937 founder, the Imperial Relations Trust.

Epithet: politician and industrialist

Title: 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley

British Library Archives and Manuscripts Catalogue : Person : Description : ark:/81055/vdc_100000000471.0x0002c2

Stanley Baldwin (1867-1947) was born on 3 August 1867 in Lower Park, Bewdley, the son of industrialist Alfred Baldwin. He was educated at Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge, before joining the family iron and steel business. He was elected a Conservative M.P. in 1906, and in December 1916 became Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Andrew Bonar Law. Thereafter, Baldwin served in David Lloyd George's government as Junior Lord of the Treasury, Financial Secretary to the Treasury and President of the Board of Trade. He became Chancellor of the Exchequer in 1922, and Prime Minister in 1923. Baldwin lost the 1929 General Election, but served as President of the Council in the new National Government, before replacing Ramsey MacDonald as Prime Minister in June 1935. He resigned in 1937, and was later made Earl Baldwin of Bewdley. He died on 14 December 1947.

Baldwin's son, Oliver Ridsdale Baldwin (1899-1958), was Viscount Corvedale, later 2nd Earl Baldwin, author, journalist and M.P.

From the guide to the Stanley Baldwin: Letters to Oliver Ridsdale Baldwin, 1916-1947, (Cambridge University Library, Department of Manuscripts and University Archives)

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Permalink:
http://n2t.net/ark:/99166/w6000n4g
Ark ID:
w6000n4g
SNAC ID:
30530912

Subjects:

  • Illumination of books and manuscripts, English--20th century
  • Obituaries
  • Labour
  • Political parties
  • Government
  • Manuscripts--English
  • Finance
  • Sailors
  • Disarmament
  • Colonies
  • Armed Forces
  • Patriotic literature, English
  • International relations
  • Trade
  • Politics
  • defence

Occupations:

not available for this record

Places:

  • Mount Everest, Tibet (as recorded)
  • Great Britain (as recorded)
  • Ireland (as recorded)
  • Illinois--Urbana (as recorded)
  • Bundi State, India (as recorded)
  • Bengal, India (as recorded)
  • Sri Lanka, Asia (as recorded)
  • Turkestan, Asia (as recorded)
  • Bhutan, Asia (as recorded)
  • Canada (as recorded)
  • Delhi, India (as recorded)
  • Manchuria, China (as recorded)
  • China, Asia (as recorded)
  • Gulmarg, Kashmir (as recorded)
  • Russia, Europe, Asia (as recorded)
  • Burma, Asia (as recorded)
  • United States, North America (as recorded)
  • United Provinces, India (as recorded)
  • Czechoslovakia, Europe (as recorded)
  • Sind, India (as recorded)
  • Rhodesia, Africa (as recorded)
  • Canada, North America (as recorded)
  • Ireland, Europe (as recorded)
  • Assam, India (as recorded)
  • Himalaya Mountains, Tibet (as recorded)
  • Abu, Rajputana (as recorded)
  • North-West Frontier Province, India (as recorded)
  • Afghanistan, Asia (as recorded)
  • Chitral State, India (as recorded)
  • Punjab, India (as recorded)
  • Iceland, Europe (as recorded)
  • Hunza, Kashmir (as recorded)
  • Central Asia, Asia (as recorded)
  • Colworth House, Bedford (as recorded)
  • Bombay, India (as recorded)
  • Gilgit, Kashmir (as recorded)
  • Mustagh Pass, Kashmir (as recorded)
  • Tonk State, India (as recorded)
  • South Africa, Africa (as recorded)
  • Tibet, Asia (as recorded)
  • Indore State, India (as recorded)
  • Bihar and Orissa, India (as recorded)
  • India, Asia (as recorded)
  • Chesterfield House, London (as recorded)
  • Pamir, India (as recorded)
  • England (as recorded)
  • Madras, India (as recorded)
  • North-West Frontier, India (as recorded)
  • Central Provinces, India (as recorded)
  • Srinagar, Kashmir (as recorded)
  • Calcutta, India (as recorded)
  • Gobi Desert, China (as recorded)
  • India (as recorded)